The Lunacy Trial of Samuel Cornett

Transcribed by Dann M. Norton, 25 Jan, 2015.

                In 1861, Mary (Cornett) Gilliam of Henry County, Missouri, sued her sister Nancy (Cornett) Norvell and Nancy’s heirs to acquire half of her father’s estate.  The suit, filed in Scott County, Virginia, unequivocally states that Mary and Nancy were daughters of Samuel Cornett and Mary Benham, and further, the suit confirms that Mary and Nancy were the only children born to Samuel Cornett and Mary Benham.

                Samuel Cornett married Mary Benham (also spelled Bennan on the marriage record) on 18 May, 1791, in Washington County, Virginia.  (Washington County is the parent county of Russell and Scott Counties.)  A copy of the marriage record is included in the chancery file on page 55 of the digital copy at the Library of Virginia website.

                Samuel abandoned Mary Benham and her daughters, moving to Kentucky with Mary “Polly” Davidson.  No marriage record is extant for this second relationship, and the lunacy trial documents refer to Davidson as his concubine, and all of her children as illegitimate.  Four other children are expressly named or referred to in the trial: sons William and Samuel, who received deeds from their father prompting an injunction by Nancy Norvell on 22 February, 1847, in Perry County, Kentucky.  A son Hiram is also named, and a daughter whose sons are named Ingram.  This daughter would be Elizabeth “Betty” Cornett Ingram.  (In some genealogies, Betty is given the maiden name Ison, but the death record of her daughter, Sarah Ingram Akeman, confirms the Cornett last name.)

                What follows is the transcription of about 20 pages of handwritten copies from the Perry County, Kentucky court; pages which were sent to Scott County for the case in Virginia.  The page numbers refer to the digital copy viewed online at the website for the Library of Virginia, Virginia Memory Project: Chancery Court Index. http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=169-1861-012. See this link for the entire chancery file.

Page 66

State of Kentucky

Perry Circuit Sct

[    ] before William B. Kinkead Judge of the Perry Circuit Court on Tuesday the 27th Day of March 1849

Nancy Norvel etc Complainants

Against  }  on a petition in Chy

Samuel Carnitt Sr, etc Defendants

                Be it Remembered that heretofore to wit on the 22nd day of February 1847, the complainant aforesaid filed by their attorney in the Clerk of Perry Circuit Court their Bill in chancery against the said defendants in the following words and figures to wit

                To the Honorable Judge of the Perry Circuit Court in Chancery now sitting your humble petitioners, Thomas C Norvel and his wife Nancy who was Nancy Carnitt the daughter of Samuel Carnitt that the said Carnitt has a Large personal and Real Estate in this County to wit 5 Slaves named Ester Nancy Maryan Harrison and Daniel and one tract of land and articles of personal property all of the Value of $5,000 they would further Represent unto your honor that their said father had by their mother two children Nancy and Polly who intermarried with Joshua Gillium they he had been living in a state of fornication with a concubine by whom he is supposed to have several children they state said illegitimate children is using all their influence and power which in his deterated  intellect is considerable to get his property out of his hands and make it their own they state said concubines Children treats him inhumanly and through farce and fraud can induce him (Page 67) to succumb to their will they further state he is now near 90 years of age and is and has been for about 8 years past wholly incapable of managing his estate owing to this inability of mind in truth he has been for that Length of time Labouring under insanity that Disqualified him to attend to business that he is the dupe of all designing persons who may attempt to get his property they state he has Really Conveyed to William Cornitt an illegitimate son all of his property Said Conveyance was made during the time of his insane condition they state his Estates in great danger of being squandered and reduced from debility to parts beyond the Reach and Control of himself and those entitled to it or his devise and beyond the jurisdiction of your honourable court unless Restrained by the timely interposition of your honor they Charge that their Said father being to his extreme old age and a disease under which he is and has been laboring for years past is Rendered wholly incompetent manage his property and affairs with ordinary prudence in fact his mind has so fair sunk under age and disease as to Reduce him to a second State of childhood or lunacy and he stands with his property exposed to all the Villy acts of cunning and fraud of designing men.  They therefore pray Your honor to take Cognizance of their humble petition and grant them a write in the nature of a write of lunacy to inquire into the State of mind of their said father and that a committee be appointed to take charge of and preserve the person and property of said Samuel Carnitt they pray for an injunction Restraining the Sale or removal of said property until Said inquest can be held and that (Page 68) William Carnitt the illegitimate son aforesaid and Samuel Carnitt another illegitimate son who has recently got possession of part of his property and all other persons who may have the possession of said property or any part thereof be injoined and Restrained from Removing Selling or otherwise disposing of the property he purchases or pretended to purchase of said Samuel Carnitt since his unsoundness of mind aforesaid.

                They ask for all general and special Relief and such proceedings in the premises as is consistent with the power of your honorable court in the premises he prays for a spa to issue against said Samuel Carnitt and William Carnitt and that they answer this petition according to the Rules of the Court in Such cause and as in duty they will ever pray etc  Harris & Burris

The following is the Judge’s order on the bill to wit

                On hearing the application of the petitioners upon petition affidavits and oral testimony it is ordered that the clerk of the Perry Circuit Court issue a Spa against Said Samuel Carnitt and his supposed illegitimate Sons William Carnitt and Samuel Carnitt with an Injunction Restraining them or Either of them from Selling Removing or otherwise disposing of said property until the further order of this court the sheriff is directed and ordered to take the Slaves into his possession and deliver them unto the hands of Robert S. Brashers who is appointed Committee of said Carnitt’s property until the further order of this court But said Sheriff is directed to permit said Slaves to Remain in possession of said defendants on their Executing bond to the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the penalty of $5,000 Conditioned to have said property forthcoming (Page 69) to answer the order of this Court the Clerk is directed to Issue writ in the nature of a writ of lunacy to inquire into the state of mind of Said Samuel Carnitt returnable to the first Day of the next term of said Perry Circuit court

Given under my hand this 7th day of October 1846

                                                                                W.B.Kinkead  Judge of the 19th  Judicial District

State of Kentucky

                                                                Perry Circuit Sct

I Jesse Combs Clerk of the court for the Circuit Aforesaid Certify that the foregoing is A Complete copy of the petition and Judges order on the same in the suit herein mentioned, In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and cause the seal of Said Court to affixed At hazard this 7th Day of March 1855

                                                Jesse Combs, Clerk of the

                                                Perry Circuit Court

Perry Circuit  Sct

The fee for the forgoing copy and seal is $1.23 ½

State of Kentucky, county of Perry, to wit,

 I Green Adams Judge of the Circuit court for the County of Perry in the State of Kentucky and the only judge thereof, do certify that Jessee Combs who has given the preceding certificate, is and was at the date thereon, clerk of the said court, and that his said attestation is in due form.

                Given under my hand this 29th day of June 1855

                                                                Green Adams

                                                                Judge 12th District KY

Honl. Green Adams will please make the foregoing certificate and forward to me, at Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia.                                                                Saml. V. Fulkerson

                31st May ‘55

Page 70  Back of document

Norvel

v.} copy of Bill etc

S.Carnitt

1855 Amt filed                   S.H.Morison, DC

Page 71—Here begins about 20 pages of a copy of a suit from Perry County, Kentucky

State of Kentucky

                                                Perry Circuit Sct  [    ] before William B. Kinkead Judge of the Perry Circuit Court at the Court House in Hazard on the 27th Day of March 1849

Thomas C. Norvell and Nancy his wife etc. Complainants

Against } in Chancery

Samuel Carnitt and William Carnitt etc Defendants

                Be it Remembered that heretofore to wit on the 22nd Day of February 1847 the said complainants filed their Bill in Chancery against the said Defendants which bill is in the following words and figures to wit—

                To the Honorable Judge of the Perry Circuit court in Chancery now Sitting your Humble petitioner, Thomas C. Norvell and his wife Nancy who was Nancy Carnitt the Daughter of Samuel Carnitt that the said Carnitt has a large personal and Real Estate in this county to wit 5 Slaves named Easter Nancy Maryan Harrison and Daniel and one tract of Land and various articles of personal property all of the Value of $5,000.  They would further represent unto your honor that their said father had by their mother two children to wit your petitioner Nancy and Polly who intermarried with Joshua Gillim.  They state he had been living in a state of fornication with a Concubine by whom he is supposed to have several children.  They state said illegitimate Children is using all their influence and power which in his [deter?] intellect is considerable to git property out of his hands and make their own.  They state said Concubines Children treats him inhumanely and through farce and fraud can induce him (Page 72) to succeed to their will. They further state is now about 90 years of age and is and has been for about 8 years past wholly incapable of managing his Estate owing to his inability of mind in [which] he has been for that length of time laboring under insanity that Disqualifies him to attend to Business that he is the Dupe of all Desyning persons who may attempt to git his property. They state he has Really Conveyed to William Carnitt an illegitimate son all of his property since conveyance was made during the term of his insane condition.  They state his Estate is in great danger of being squandered and

[ransomed]

fraudulently to parts beyond the Reach and Control of himself and those entitled to it in his Decease and beyond the Jurisdiction of your Honorable Court unless restrained by the timely interposition of your honor. They charge that their said father being to his extreme old age and a disease under which he is and has been laboring for years past is rendered wholly incompetent to manage his property and affairs with ordinary presence in fact his mind has so far [sunk] under age and disease as to Render him to a second state of childhood or Lunacy and he stands with his property exposed to all the Vily acts of Cunning and fraud of designing men.  They therefore pray your honor to take Cognizance of their (Page 73) Humble petitioner and grant them a writ in the Nature of a writ of Lunacy to inquire into the State of the mind of their said Father and that a committee be appointed to take Charge of and preserve the person and property of said Samuel Carnitt. They pray for an Injunction Restraining the sale or [removal] of said property until said inquest can be held and William Carnitt the illegitimate son of [the] said and Samuel Carnitt an other illegitimate son who has recently got possession of part of his property an all other persons who may have taken possession of said property or any part of by enjoined and Restrained from [Re?] Selling or other wise disposing of the property he purchased or pretended to purchase of said Samuel Carnitt Since his unsoundness of mind aforesaid. They ask for all general and special relief and such proceedings in the [pr?] as is consistent with the powers of your Honorable Court in the premises he prays for A Spa. to issue against Said Samuel Cornitt and William Cornitt and that they answer this petition according to the rules of the Court for such causes and [     ] duty they will [ever] pray etc

                                                                                                                Harris & Burns

Page 74

The following is the affidavit of General R.S.Brashears and Captain James Hogg filed in this Cause which Reads as follows to wit

Commonwealth of Kentucky

                Letcher County to wit

                General R.S. Brashears maketh oath that he is acquainted with Samuel Carnitt of Perry County and is Very concerned for [blotted] Several years he has been unable [   ] from the [  ] of a disposing mind to transact his affairs and that has no doubt lives now in the same situation sworn to 8th Oct 1846 [   ]

                John Maggard JP LC

Captain James Hogg concurs with General Brashears fully sworn to the same this 8th Oct 1846.

                John Maggard JP LC

The following is the Judge’s order which is the following words and figures to wit

On hearing that the Application of the petitioner, upon petition Affidavit, and oral testimony  it is ordered that the Clerk of the Perry Circuit Court issue a Spa against Said Samuel Carnitt and his supposed illegitimate sons William Carnitt and Samuel Carnitt with an Injunction Restraining them or either of them from selling  removing or otherwise disposing of said property until the further order of this Court.  (Page 75)  The Sheriff is Directed and ordered to take the Slaves in to his possession and Deliver them unto the hands of Robert S. Brashears who is appointed trustee of said Carnitt’s property until the further order of this Court but said Sheriff is Directed to permit said Slaves to Remain in the possession of said defendants as their Executing Bond to the Commonwealth of Kentucky the penalty of $5,000.

                Conditioned to have said property forth coming to answer the order of this Court the clerk is directed to issue a writ the virtue of a writ of Lunacy to inquire into the state of the mind of said Samuel Cornitt Returnable to the first day of the next term of said Perry Circuit Court given under my hand the 7th of October 1846.  W.B.Newhall, Judge of the 19th Judicial Circuit.

And upon the forgoing Bill the following writ of Inquiry do issue to wit.

                The Commonwealth of Kentucky to the Sheriff of Perry County Greeting

We command you to summon twelve good and lawful men of your Bailiwick to diligently inquire into the state of mind of Samuel Carnitt Sr. of your county whether he be  from his birth children to be a Lunatic by which the custody of his lands and tenements ought to be [L–?] to [upon] whether by misfortune or otherwise he afterwards fell into such (Page 76) Infirmity by Reason whereof Such Custody ought not to be [   ] to as if by misfortune or otherwise thereby what misfortune and how and in what manner and what age he was and of whom his Lands and tenements are and directly held and by what services and who now holds them and how much are they worth by the year and unto Receiving the profits thereof and send the inquisition thereof Distinctly and openly made to us in our Said Perry Circuit Court in Chancery at the Courthouse in the town of Hazard on the first Day of the next March term 1847. Under your hands and seals together with this writ Witness Jesse Combs Clerk of our Said court at office this 12th day of March 1847, and in the 55th year of the Commonwealth.

                                                                                                                Jesse Combs Clk

And upon the foregoing writ the Sheriff made the following Return to wit

Executed on Samuel Carnitt March the 16th Day of 1847.

                Z. Morgan D S for J. Morgan SPC

                And at a Circuit Court held for the County and Circuit aforesaid at the Courthouse in the town of Hazard on Saturday the 27the Day of March 1847 the following order was made to wit—

This day came the parties aforesaid by their attorneys and the defendant by his Attorney filed his answer and by consent of the parties this cause was submitted to a Jury Wherefore came a Jury to wit Wilson Baker Justice Boling Abraham Eversole Edward Little Jeremiah L. Combs Jr. Levi Pennington Terry H. Milton Shadrick Stacy James Williams Wesley Combs William Hoskins and Hiram Begley who being Elected tried and sworn upon their oaths do say We the Jury Empowered Returned and Sworn and Charged to inquire into the state of mind of Samuel Carnitt we find that the said S. Carnitt is of unsound mind and that he hath been so the last five years past that his [    ] unsoundness of mind was occatianed by his Extreme old age Connected with bodily infirmity We further find Said Carnitt is a resident and Citizen of Perry county and hath been for 12 years past We do further find that Said Samuel Carnitt owns a Large Real and personal Estate consisting of Slaves, lands, etc and that being to his unsoundness of mind he is unable to manage the same with ordinary prudence  Given under our hands and seals Wilson Baker <seal> Justice Boling <seal> Abraham Eversole <seal> Edward Little <seal> Levi Pennington <seal> Terry H. Milton <seal> (Page 78) Shadrick Stacy <seal> James Williams <seal> William Hoskins <seal> Hiram Begley <seal> Wesely Combs <seal> Jeremiah L. Combs <seal>

                The following is the answer of Samuel Carnitt filed in the cause which answer Reads as follows to wit

                The separate answer of Samuel Cornitt Snr to a petition in the Perry circuit against him and others by Nancy and Thomas C. Norvell  This Respondent returning the many Errors in the petition for a [blotted] thereto and to the very many false Representatives he sais unto this Respondent being a Lunatic or of Feeble mind now or during the whole period of time alleged he sais Every word is untrue and facts he admits he is an old man and feeble in Body his age is near about 73 or 74 years, but as to his mind During his life to this time he was and is capable of transacting his own business.  It is true he did Execute a Deed to his son William the consideration was for natural Love to his son and the further consideration that the grantee would maintain this Respondent.  He disavows the Complainant Nancy as his Daughter (Page 79) In a short time after this Respondent married with his first wife she was [Burned] which was the cause of his [crossed out] Abandoning his former wife.  He then upwards of 30 years since emigrated as one of the pioneers to Kentucky his former wife intermarried with another man.  He raised by his last wife his present children two of whom are his co-defendants and who helped him toil to increase his little property whom the petitioners now seeks to take his property given him and the [inquire] of his own will and mind he states that the petitioner Nancy has been Repeatedly harassing your Respondent for A Bill of Sale of his property on visits from Va where he supposes she is now Domicilled and this Respondent entirely refused to do so Now this complainant with others, finding no such bill of sale could be obtained [ blotted out] have undertaken by their petition and the will of the Law to direct the property from William Carnitt and from your Respondent. He denies that his Children should be called illegitimate and he denies that they ever did impose upon your Respondent but have Kind and Respectful as dutiful children. (Page 80) Respondent having answered asks that the petition be dismissed and to have his costs.

Personally came before me David K. Butter JP Samuel Carnitt who made oath that the facts set forth in the above answer are true given under my hand this 23 day of March 1847.

                                                                                                David K. Butter JPPC

                And afterward to wit at the same court continued and held for the county and Circuit aforesaid on the 27th day of March 1847, the following order was made to wit—

[Blotted The] defendant filed his grounds herein to set aside the Verdict of the Jury which is overruled by the Court and the defendant Excepts which Bill of Exceptions are made part of the Record by consent of the parties And the following is the grounds filed for a new trial which grounds Reads as follows

Samuel Carnitt Sr vs. Nancy Norvell, etc] Petition in Chy

                On an inquisition of Lunacy the defendant Samuel Carnitt moves the Court to set aside the Verdict of the Jury Discharge the Restraining order and dismiss the petition because the Jury found contrary to the Evidence and Instructions of the Court.

(Page 81)  The following is the Bill of Exceptions filed in this cause by the Defendant Samuel Carnitt Sr. to wit.

Nancy Norvell etc Complainants v. Samuel Carnitt Sr Defendant

In Chancery upon an issue and writ of Lunacy

                Be it Remembered that upon the trial of this cause the petitioners introduced Robert S. Brashears, A witness who proved that from his Knowledge of Samuel Carnitt Sr  he was not competent [to] manage his business or affairs and was easily to be imposed upon by designing men that he lived some 15 miles from Carnitts and had seen him some two or three times in the Course of an year and as three years past once at his Store Witness Store when he bought a pair of cloth pantaloons at and Extravagant price which not customary for him to do and that Carnitt said he intended to git married again that he Carnitt was between 70 & 80 years of age that he was nearly blind and hard of hearing he said Carnitt said he was afraid of his Life.

                In addition to the above General Brashears swore he had been (Page 82) Acquainted with Samuel Carnitt for forty years that he was once a man of energy and of Reasonable Capacity to conduct his affairs that for five or six years past he had not considered him capable of a prudent management of his affairs he had sunk in mind and body more than any man he ever heard he was wanderly in his conversations for a moment So he would appear Rational for one of his age he would then Change his subject frequently and take Childs by and in con sent by he had [  ] a [tra—] for many years that Carnitt had had much Dealings with him and the utmost friendship had always prevailed Between them S. Carnitt had Alluded to him the treatment of his illegitimate children he told him his gran children he thought made the attack on him in the night he was much injured as he said and came very near being killed. Rumor in [crossed out] Spoke of the Danger the old man was in but he knew nothing personally about it when Cross Examined about the old man’s conversations about marring (Page 83) he said the old man was in earnest and that he was of the opinion that that is the old man was going to marry but that he had not seen him more than twice in a year for about three years, he said he never saw a more Exact Likeness between a woman and man than Mrs. Norvel  was to her father Carnitt.

                D.N.Bittor was introduce by the counsel for Samuel Carnitt he proved that he was called up by some person to Administer the oath to Carnitt that it was Read to him denied Nancy Norvel to be his child and swore to it. He regarded the old man Very old and feeble and in his do to age.

                They then introduced an other Sampson Brashier who proved that he had been acquainted with Carnitt for a good many years Lived some 17 or 18 miles from witness Saw him several times in the course of a year that he did not [believe] he was able to manage his affairs more than he [  ] a child of one year of age could he was about 70 or 80 years of age and that he was blind and hard of hearing and that he heard Carnitt say Some person perhaps some of his grandchildren he thought had committed a trespass upon him in the night, came into the house and inflicted a blow upon him (Page 84) that Carnitt said one of his illegitimate sons had [ run?  ] of his Negro woman and that he had heard of her and that he intended to go after her.  He also said the old man told him he was afraid of his life that his illegitimate Children had treated him Badly had taken his money that Hiram had run off a negro girl and sold her to Thomas Strong that they had killed a [   ] steer and fooled him by taking the horns from the carcass and putting there a cow that was alive to apeare him.

                They then introduced Lusk a witness who proved that Carnitt could not be cheated in trading that he could direct his affairs as usual and as good as men of his age but that he was nearly blind and hard of hearing

                They then introduced Squire Byby a witness who proved he had been acquainted with Carnitt about 50 years; that he first knew him that period ago in Va but had not seen him but twice in two years the last time about twelve months since and that he did not believe he was capable of managing his affairs that he was about 90 years old being very frail lived about 25 miles from Carnitts that Carnitt claimed Nancy Norvel as his daughter several years since that once was a sensible man and a powerful man in strength (Page 85) that now he was gone in Body and mind more than any man he ever knew.

                They introduced Byby the Son of last witness, who proved he had been acquainted with Carnitt that he had been sheriff of Perry County for four years and knew Carnitt well that he lived some 25 miles from Carnitt, saw him the last time that the other witness spoke of that he was Very old and frail that he did not believe him capable of managing his affairs that Carnitt Claimed Nancy Norvel several years since as his daughter Carnitt he said had changed very much he talked wildly and was certainly much impaired any way.

                They then introduced Mr. Burns an other witness who proved that Nancy Norvell had a Very Striking resemblance of Carnitt.

                They then introduced H.C. Harris Esqr Witness who proved that Nancy Norvel had a Very Striking Resemblance of Carnitt.

                The Deft Carnitt then introduced Napier a Witness who proved Carnitt staid all night at his house a few days before that he had traveled from home some 25 miles thence in a few miles of Breathitt Court house and back in the whole distance of 85 miles in Company with his Black Boy (Page 86) That he Carnitt Conversed and could direct his servant about his horse and that he said he went with him one mile of Breathitt courthouse to attend to a suit with Duff Crt that he was one of the witnesses who told him that his cause was continued and Returned that Carnitt appeared to have a good a mind as any man of his age he was nearly blind and terrible hard of hearing he was complaining of the fatigue of riding over the mountains.

                He then introduced Ingram who proved he knew Carnitt for many years he lived in one mile and a half of him he was a son of one of his illegitimate Daughters, that he had mind amply sufficient to manage his affairs and could not be cheated in a trade that he was able and did direct his affairs but that he was hard of hearing Sometimes he would change from one subject to another when talking with persons but this was being to him not hearing well when persons would speak to him supposing he understood them when he did not he heard him say that he supposed and thought that is one of his negroes that made the assault upon him that Carnitt and illegitimate children lived very agreeably together that the old man directed all his affairs.

(Page 87) He then introduced an other witness the Brother of the above who proved the same in substance substantially as the other witness.

                Then Major Crump was introduced who proved that he had been Carnitt’s Lawyer and had been acquainted with him for some years, he believed that he had mind sufficient to manage his business and with his transactions with him he had never detected a want of mind he heard Rumors that Carnitt was in a situation to loose his property from persons who would steal his property.

Then Austin C. Godsey was introduced Who proved that he had been acquainted with Carnitt for several years that he never had much sense that he was pernicious that he was very old and feeble had not seen him for some time until within a few days past he thought he had mind sufficient to manage his Estate or business so far as he knew that he was near 80-90 years old he supposed but did not knew his precise age this being all the evidence in the cause the Jury Returned their verdict in these words to wit. In suit it here caused the Defendant Samuel Carnitt Sen moved the court to set aside the verdict and dismiss the petition because the Jury found contrary to the evidence

(Page 88)  And the same given by the court which motion was overturned by the court and the Deft Carnitt excepts and prays this his Bill of Exception to be sealed and made part of the Record which is done.

                                                W.B.Kinkead (seal)

                And afterwards, to wit at the same court conditioned and held for the county and Circuit aforesaid at the courthouse in the town of Hazard on the 27th day of March 1847.

The following order was made in this cause to wit

                Be it Remembered that this cause was submitted to a Jury by the consent of the parties and the counsels for S. Carnitt and after the testimony being heard the jury formed the Verdict in this cause it is decreed that Robert S. Brashear be continued and again appointed a trustee for Samuel Carnitt whose Duty it shall be to Receive from the Sheriff the Real and personal property of the said Samuel Carnitt and he is directed to hire out the Slaves, and rent out the land as in his judgment it may seem proper he is empowered and Directed to provide and maintain Samuel Carnitt out of his Real and personal property and he will preserve the property and take care that (Page 89) the same is forth coming when Requested by the Court and Report his acts to the next term of this court the sheriff of this county is directed to deliver the Real and personal property in the pleadings mentioned to the said Brashears and this cause is continued the Clerk is directed to issue the Restraining order here in forthwith—

And upon the forgoing Record the following Restraining order Issued to wit

                To the Sheriff of Perry County Greeting

You are hereby commanded as must be to take with you the power of the county of Perry and deliver to Robert S. Brashears five slaves by the Names of Ester, Nancy, Maryan, Harison and Daniel the property of Samuel Carnitt and any other personal property belonging to said Carnitt and also to deliver to him the lands and tenements of the said Samuel Carnitt without delay and make due return of this order according to law

                                                                Jesse Combs, Clk

And upon the foregoing Restraining order the Sheriff made the following Return to wit—

                In obedience to the within I summoned John Brashears, James Brashears, Sampson Brashears Jr and Ezekiel Brashears and Linsey Early to aid me to seize the property herein mentioned I accordingly took into possession the Slaves Ester Nancy David Harrison and

(Page 90) another small girl child of Ester and a horse the land I did not deliver as General Brashear was not present I have Delivered the Slaves and horse to Robert S. Brashears March 30th 1847

                                                                Jesse Morgan DS

                                                                For John Morgan SPC

And afterwards to wit at a Court contained and held for the County and Circuit aforesaid on the 27th day of March 1848. The following order was made in this cause to wit

                Ordered by the court that the sum of thirty seven dollars and fifty cents be allowed to Jesse Morgan Late Sheriff of Perry County for services rendered in delivering certain Slaves belonging to Samuel Carnitt Lunatic to Robert S. Brashears Committee under A former order of this Court and to James Brashears, Linsey Holcum, John Brashears, Ezekial Brashear, and Sampson Brashers each $3.90 cts for traveling 40 miles and guarding Slaves in carring out said order which the said committee is ordered to pay

[over]

out of [effects] aforesaid and the cause is continued

                And the same court continued and held in the 20th day of March 1848

The following order was made in this cause to wit—ordered by the court

(Page 91) That Robert S. Brashears Committee for Samuel Carnitt a Lunatic proceed immediately to sell so much of the personal estate of said Samuel Carnitt as he may deem necessary and pay the expenses he has been at under the order of this court and Report his activity and doings in said case to the court at the next term.

                And afterwards to wit at a court continued and held for the Perry circuit as aforesaid on the 26th day of September 1848

The following order was made in this cause

Continued

At a court continued and held for the Perry Circuit as a aforesaid on the 27th Day of March 1849

The following order was made to wit—

Nancy Norvel etc

Against  } In Chy Discontinued

Samuel Carnitt Sr

                In [   ]

Bill                                                                                                                                          1

Affidavits of Brashears & Hogg                                                                   4

Judges order                                                                                                                      4&5

Writ of Lunacy                                                                                                                   5&6

Jury & Verdict                                                                                                                    7

S.Carnits answer                                                                                                              8&9

Motion or a new trial overturned                                                                             10

Bill of Exceptions                                                                                                              11.12.13.14.15.16.17.

Decree                                                                                                                                 18

Restraining order                                                                                                             19

[Claims allowed]                                                                                                               20

Committee ordered to sell property                                                                       21

(Page 92)

State of Kentucky

                                Perry Circuit Sct

I Jesse Combs Clerk of the Court for the Circuit aforesaid Certify that the foregoing twentyone pages contains a full and complete transcript of the Record and proceedings in the suit therein mentioned In testimony  whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the said court to be affixed at Hazard on the

2nd Day of March 1855

                                                Jesse Combs, Clerk

                                                Of Perry Circuit Court

Fee for the foregoing Record is $4.21 ½ cts

                                                Jesse Combs, clk

I do certify that Jesse Combs is circuit court clerk in the County of Perry Kentucky given under my hand this March 3rd 1855                                               John Hyden Jr P.J.P.C

Grandpa's Christmas List, 1934

A couple of years ago, my great-aunt, Sharron Norton Fenn, sent me some letters, two written by my grandfather, Clarence Norton, to his father, Harley Raymond Norton. Those letters are 85 years old in 2019.

Clarence Norton on a horse

The backstory: Harley Raymond Norton (1901-1962) was married to Cecil Mae Tharp (1895-1939).

Harley Raymond Norton and Cecil M. Tharp Norton

She had crippling arthritis. Harley wasn’t able to care for her, and they separated and divorced in the mid-1920s. They had two little boys–Donald went to live with his mother and the Grandparents Tharp; Clarence went to live with the Grandparents Norton.

Paschal and Susan Norton with grandson, Clarence

The 1930 census shows Grandpa Clarence, age 8, living with Paschal and Susan. I’m not sure how long he had been with them. Grandpa’s father, Harley Raymond Norton, had joined the Navy and was stationed around the world, but usually in California–that’s a long way from Missouri!

Harley Raymond Norton, 1929
Harley Raymond Norton, “Guantanamo Transportation”

The letters Aunt Sharron sent were from 1934, one from August, which sounds like Grandpa received some school supplies from his dad now in California.

Spickard Mo Augest 28, 1934

Dear Daddy

How are you? I am all O.K. I got my things OK. I got two eversharps, 4 lead pencils, one compess, one thing to make parts of rings, one transparent ruler, one note book full of paper 6 eraser’s 2 box’s of eversharp leads. I think it will last me through one 12 in. eyesaver one 6 in. eyesaver. I will be in the seventh grade. got 4 good pair of overalls 5 shirts 6 pair of soks. she said she was going to send a pair of shoes. ma got me a new saddle girt. alma started to work at the canning factery last night. Ma is going to get work. Pa is going to work on the road. and I will go to school. We haven’t got a thing to eat but what we buy at town. Jessie is working at the green house at Treton. I was down to Jessie Sunday and John Philip came home with us. I hope you will get well.

I will close for this time

answer soon from Clarence to Daddy

We got your pictures OK she looks fine.

The “she” mentioned is Harley’s new wife, Louise. Harley had remarried in 1933, but he was ill and in the hospital. Through Mary Louise, Harley was sending money and items back to Missouri to help out.

Paschal also sent a letter at the same time. It began, “Me, I am nocked out quite a bit. my hart is trying to go back on me quite a bit anymore. and has bin so hot so long. But now has cooled off quite a bit and had some nice rain but not near enough yet as will take lots to start the pastures to do any good. And shure need it bad as feed is going to be awfly scarce and every body is feeding now and if hafto keep it up till next spring wont have 1/2 enough for the winter. we have sold all of our cows but 3. And the 3 horses and wont have feed enough then.” It was the Depression; times were hard, Grandpa Paschal was sick.

The next letter, written in November, appears to be Grandpa’s Christmas list for 1934. 

Spickard Missouri, November 4, 1934

Dear Dad,

How are you? I am all O, K. I got my shoes all O.K. I am going to school right along. Just mist one day. It rained all night last night. We went over to Sunday school but didn’t have any, so we went over to Sikes and stayed all day. I would rather have the money sent to me. I wish you would send me 5 or 6 boxes of shot gun shels they are 60 to 70 cents a box with 25 shels in a box they are prety high here. there has been a lot of ducks on the lake but I haven’t got any yet. I would like to have a rifle they don’t cost much and the shels don’t cost very much I would rather have a good rifle than the bicycle. It rained some more last night to. but not to mount to anything. Well this morning is school morning. Kenneth Bosly came home with me last night we had a good time.

Answer soon

Clarence to dad.

Paschal’s PS at the end of the letter is great. 

“I see he wants a rifle and some shot gun shells he don’t need eather as he has all the shot gun shells he wants and that is enough. and his gun is good enough anaway. There is not much to hunt anymore Paschal 

In a separate letter, written November 7, Paschal tells Harley: “Clarence has been writing to you and Loise, I gess for a few things but he has a good lot of cloaths for winter and that is enough. he has got everything you folks has sent him and all was just all right–he got those shoes all right to and a good fit he don’t need that Bicksickle at all So don’t get it. Ma went to town and got his winter underware so he is all right.–he will need a new suit in the spring for summer but that is quite a ways off yet. So can see about that then.”

Paschal was not going to find out what Santa brought Clarence that year.  Another letter (copied by Sharron) starts out:

            Spickard MO, 8:50 O’clock  Dec 12 -34

            Dear Harlie,

            Papa is still alive. But real low.  And expecting him to pass away any minute. He knows what is going on part of the time. The Dr has no hopes for him at all. Just a few more hours at best to be with us. His heart is far below normal And dropsey is developing fast. His legs are as big as can be and feet also. His abdomen is awful hard and filling fast. Almost to his heart. So when it gets there it is all over. Momma is holding up very well. Yes Harlie you send Clarence 10.00 if you can. He needs a suit…Hasen’t any. Papa hasent any crop to go on. And had to buy feed. So it is sure close times for him. Sorry you are sick. Tell us what is the matter of you. I want the truth. I won’t tell momma if you don’t want her to know. But us girls would like to know. Write one us. It is about mail time. Us girls are both here And aim to stay. We have been here a week. The nighbors are awful good. Have plenty of company. Jessie is writing this. Good by we will do the best we can. Will write Louise. Momma & Clarence

The letter was written by Jessie, Paschal’s daughter, and sent to Harley at the Naval hospital because Harley was also sick.  By the time Harley received the last letter, Paschal had passed away.  He died on 14 December, 1934, and was laid to rest at Wild Chapel Cemetery.

What hard times.  I would gather this was the hardest Christmas Grandpa ever had—he was only 12, a seventh-grader.  His dad was gone; he did not see his mother much; now his grandpa, his guardian, was dead. 

I don’t think Grandpa Clarence got that shotgun or those shells, but he was not left empty-handed. A photo in Grandma Mary’s albums shows “Clarence’s bicycle.” 

Clarence’s bicycle

This article started out to be a jovial look at the Christmas list of a 12-year-old in 1934. As I read the letters more closely, there was a lot of hardship and true sadness that accompanied those wishes. Maybe that’s what the true lesson from the letters becomes–there’s joy and sadness–there always will be–but we can’t give up on wishes. We can’t give up on Christmas! We know bad times and sad times will come, but so will happy times. We have to keep pushing forward to the happy times. To those who are having happy times, and those who are pushing toward happy times…MERRY CHIRSTMAS.

Walter McAtee (1756-1833) Revolutionary War Veteran

Most online family trees will show that Walter McAtee is the son of Patrick McAtee Jr. and his wife, Maria Shircliff. That information has been online and in other published versions of the McAtee genealogies for so long, new researchers probably think it is a fact–and based on some record. However, if one tries to reverse-engineer the “research” that has come up with this connection, he or she will find that the parentage of Walter is not based on any records. Rather, it is based on the proximity of Walter McAtee–one of the Catholic members of the McAtee family–to some other Catholic McAtees, particularly, Henry Maurice McAtee, a proven son of Patrick McAtee, Jr and Maria Shircliff.

Is there any proof that Walter McAtee’s parents are Patrick and Maria Shircliff McAtee? Is there proof that someone else is his father? Through careful research, and linking several records from four different counties in two different states, these two questions will be answered: no—there is no proof of Walter being son of Patrick; yes—there is proof of someone else.

There were several McAtees who lived in Nelson and Washington Counties, Kentucky. Nelson County Deed show that Thomas McAtee owned land that straddled the county line.[1] Henry McAtee purchased land in Washington County, next to Thomas.[2] Henry was born in Maryland in 1764. Some online trees say that he was born in 1754, but every single record about Henry confirms that he was born between 1760 and 1770. A marriage record (written in Latin) from the Catholic church in Perry County, Missouri, gives Henry’s age as 72 in 1836.[3] It also names his parents–Patrick McAtee and Maria Shakley. Shakley supposedly being a variation of a very common colonial Maryland named, Shircliff.

Previous researchers simply assumed that since Walter McAtee was born about 1756 in Maryland, and since he also lived in Nelson County, Kentucky, there must be a relationship. Too quickly, those previous researchers assumed that relationship to be brotherhood. Proximity is the only connection that one could use here. There are no records in Kentucky that give Walter’s parents’ names. That he was Catholic does not narrow down the possibilities because at least three lines of Catholic McAtees settled in North-Central Kentucky.[4]

There are no deeds or other records showing any close relationship between Henry McAtee and Walter McAtee. They were never witnesses or bondsmen for each other.  Henry moved to Kentucky by 1789 when he appears on the Nelson County tax lists next to Samuel and William Pottinger.[5] Thomas appears in 1790 in the household of John Melton.[6] Walter McAtee did not move to Kentucky until 1811,[7] a full decade after Henry and Thomas.  Thomas died in 1796 or 1797.[8] Henry moved to Missouri by 1819, when he disappears from the tax lists.[9] After Washington County was created out of Nelson in 1792, Henry was always listed in Washington County tax lists.[10]  Walter was always listed in Nelson County.[11] 

RECORDS ARE AMAZING THINGS! What records are available to help correctly identify Walter’s parents?

Walter was a Revolutionary War veteran and he left pension applications which give a nearly complete history of his life and migrations.[12] On a page within the pension file (which can be found on Fold3.com) are written these words: “…Walter McAtee…aged 75 years…. Your applicant was born in Charles County in the state of Maryland he believes in the year 1756….He resided in Charles County at the time he was called into the service, He has since lived in Prince Georges County Md afterwards in Montgomery County Maryland, till the fall 1811 when he removed with his family to Nelson County, Ky where he has remained ever since.”[13] The file continues with details of his military career.

Mary, the widow of Walter, applied for a widow’s pension. A page in the file states that Walter died on 20 February 1833.[14]

 A timeline of the events mentioned in the pension application would look like this:

1756 Charles Co MD Birth 1776 Charles Co MD Enlistment –no date— Prince George’s Co MD –no date— Montgomery Co MD   Fall 1811 To Nelson Co KY 20 Feb 1833 Nelson Co KY Death

Immediately, a conflict arises with the Patrick McAtee Jr to Walter McAtee connection.  Patrick McAtee Jr was in Charles County, Maryland,[15] then in Fairfax County, Virginia,[16] and his last record is in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.[17]  At no time is Walter McAtee of Nelson County, Kentucky, ever in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.  From 1756 on, no records place Patrick Jr. in Charles County, and he never appears in Prince George’s or Montgomery records.

Looking at tax records of Maryland at the time of the Revolutionary War, we find Walter listed–often next to or nearby one John McAtee–who can be identified as John McAtee Jr, the son of John McAtee Sr. Walter appears on the 1775-78 census of Charles County below the name of John McAtee.[18]

Walter is listed on the 1782 Supply Tax list.[19]  This is an alphabetic list of Port Tobacco Hundred in Charles County. Walter is listed near other McAtees including James, John, Susanna, and James of Patrick.  A Bennet Mudd is named in the middle of the McAtees.  In 1783, Walter is again listed in 4th District (Port Tobacco) of Charles County in the 1783 Assessments.[20] Also listed is James of James with 133 acres, John (no land), Walter, a few more names, Bennet Mudd, and then James of Patrick, and Susanna further down the list.  Walter owned two slaves under 7, one 7-14, and one female14-36.[21]  (There was an older John, John Sr, who owned 69 acres land in Pomonkey Hundred.)

Walter is recorded as “furnishing wheat” on 29 Dec 1782 and 3 May 1783 for the use of the Revolutionary forces.[22]

By 1790, the census reports show that John McAtee Sr is still living in Charles County,[23] but John McAtee Jr and Walter McAtee are both listed in Prince George’s County, Maryland.[24] (Another John Macatee is listed in Prince George’s County; he is the John who married a Charity, and later moved to Fairfax County, Virginia in 1796.)[25]  Walter owned six slaves.

1756 Charles Co MD Birth 1776 Charles Co MD Enlistment 1775-78 Walter named Charles Co.   1782 Walter listed near John McAtee 1783 Walter owned 4 slaves. 1790 Prince George’s Co MD census 1810 Montgomery Co MD   Fall 1811 To Nelson Co KY 20 Feb 1833 Nelson Co KY Death

Is it mere coincidence that Walter is listed in Prince George’s County, and Walter in Kentucky mentions living in Prince George’s County? Prince George’s County probates include the will of John McAtee.[26] In the will he names his daughters, Benedicta, Anna, Sarah, Eleanor, and Elizabeth, and his son, Walter. The will was drawn in 1794. Mike Marshall’s site, Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia’s Northern Neck Counties, gives Walter a birth year of 1773[27]–that is based on Walter being at least 21 as the executor of his father’s will written in 1794–so Walter was born BEFORE 1773. Since Walter is listed in the 1790 census, with three females and two males under 16, we can be sure he was married with a family in 1790. If the data indicates that he had two sons and two daughters–averaging two years between children–he must have married before 1782. If he was of age 21 at the time of the possible marriage year, then he was born BEFORE 1761.  This makes the 1756 birth year of Walter, the Revolutionary War soldier, fit well as the son of John who wrote the will.

An error made by a previous researcher is found in the works of Mary Louise Donnelly. On page 208 of her work, Charles County Maryland: My Colonial Relations Plus Others, she listed Walter as Walter William, born 1755, but called him a son of John McAtee Sr,[28] thus a brother to John McAtee Jr, who made the will in 1794 PG County. The will clearly states that Walter is the son of John—Junior—since John Senior died in 1792 in Charles County.[29] There are no records that show any brother named Walter; Donnelly made a mistake. This Walter is the first McAtee to bear the forename–there were no other Walter McAtees in any records before this man.[30])

So…Walter, born in 1756…in Charles County until 1783, married, then in Prince George’s County by 1790.  The next place of residence from the pension application was Montgomery County, Maryland.  Walter is listed on page 921 of the 1810 Census of Montgomery Co, MD.[31]

Finally, the pension paper states that Walter moved with his family to Nelson County in 1811.  Walter first appears on the 1812 tax list, and continuously until 1831.  There are no lists existing for the years 1832-1834.[32] Walter is listed in the 1820 census of Nelson County, Kentucky[33] and the 1830 census of Nelson County.[34]

I expect there to be those who nay-say and disbelieve. There are at least 242 online pedigrees at Ancestry.com that list Walter as the child of Patrick McAtee and Maria Shircliff. Not one has evidence–direct or otherwise–to confirm that connection. Produce the evidence that Walter was the son of Patrick and Maria.  The common legend of Patrick McAtee is that he was from St. Mary’s County, Maryland—Walter never lived in St. Mary’s. Patrick was never listed in Prince George’s or Montgomery Counties. If Walter were the son of Patrick, then either Walter should be in St. Mary’s or Patrick should be in PG and Montgomery. These two men–Patrick and Walter–are not found in the same places. Nothing ties them together as father and son; Walter is not the son of Patrick McAtee, Jr and Maria Shircliff.

Walter was probably added into the family of Patrick Jr and Maria Shircliff McAtee based solely on proximity and religion. Since Walter moved to Nelson County, Kentucky, and was Catholic, he must be in Patrick’s family. Try any number of record searches to connect Walter to Patrick and Maria, and you’ll just come up with guesses and hypotheses that do not add up.

What does add up is that there was one Walter born in 1756, who served in the Revolutionary War. He was definitely in Prince George’s County next to John McAtee. The migration of John from Charles County to Prince George’s County matches Walter’s relocation. This circumstantial information suggests a close relationship, but then we have direct evidence: John leaves a will in Prince George’s County naming Walter as his son. Records support every step of this connection all the way to Walter’s death in 1833, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Walter McAtee (1756-1833) is the son of John McAtee, Jr.(1729-1794), the grandson of John McAtee, Sr (1706-1792); the great-grandson of Edmund McAtee (c. 1785-1764), and the great-great-grandson of Patrick and Rosamond McAtee of Charles County, Maryland.

NOTE:  No records were located to confirm the maiden name of Walter’s wife, Mary.  Most sites say she was a Beavan.  Mary’s maiden name was not a focus of this report, but it was troubling that no records surfaced with this supposedly “proved” information.


[1] Nelson KY Deed Book 4, p 319: Samuel Canby to Thomas McAtee, 14 Sep, 1791.

[2] Washington KY Deed Book A, p 114: Samuel Canby to Henry McAtee, 13 Aug, 1793.

[3] Age is given in Marriage Records, Perry County, Missouri, Book “A” 1825-1841 by Audry Lee Wagner Woodruff (p 21).  The original record from the original book is found on page 62 and gives parents’ names of groom (Patrici McAtee and Maria Shakley, his previous wife (Anna Monarche), the brides father (Thomas Forest), and previous husband (Elijha Vessels).

[4] Records do show that besides Henry Maurice and his probable brothers, Thomas and Leonard (from the Patrick McAtee Sr. line), James McAtee, son of Samuel McAtee and Elisha McAtee, son of William (from the Edmund McAtee Sr line) were also living in the area.  The “Corrected and Recorded” McAtee family tree by the author at Ancestry.com shows that Walter is most likely a second cousin to James and Elisha, and a second cousin, once removed to Henry Maurice McAtee.

[5] Nelson County, Kentucky, List of Tithables 1785-1795, Film No. 008188444, image 69 of 166.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLZ-9HS6?i=68&cat=417360

[6] Nelson County, Kentucky, List of Tithables 1785-1795, Film No. 008188444, image 93 of 166.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLZ-94PK?i=92&cat=417360

[7] The pension papers state that Walter moved to Kentucky in 1811.

[8] Thomas appears on the Nelson County KY Tax Lists in 1790 (in household of John Melton), 1791-92 in Nelson, 1794-1796 in Washington County. His widow, Elizabeth appears in 1797, and later Hezekiah Luckett (Elizabeth’s next husband) is noted as paying for Thomas McAtee’s heirs.

[9] Henry does not appear on tax lists until 1789 in Nelson County.  He is listed in Nelson until 1791; in Washington from 1792 to 1817.  There is no 1818 list available.  Henry is not listed on the 1819 list.

[10] Washington County, KY, tax lists are available online at Familysearch.org.  Follow this link to a list of available Tax lists: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/157409?availability=Family%20History%20Library

[11] Nelson County, KY, tax lists are available online at Familysearch.org.  Follow this link to a list of available Tax lists: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/156788?availability=Family%20History%20Library

[12] Pension papers downloaded from Fold3.com. 

[13] Ibid.

[14] Ibid.

[15] Patrick McAtee, Jr is named in the 1751 Administration of estate of his brother, Benjamin McAtee and the first inventory and additional inventory.

[16] After the death of his father, Patrick Sr, in 1756, Patrick McAtee Jr. was sued by Samuel Hanson, in Fairfax Co, Virginia, in 1757. 

[17] The 1761 baptism of Susanna Thompson, at St. Joseph’s in St. Mary’s County, Maryland lists Patrick “Machaty” as a sponsor. This must be Patrick McAtee, Jr.  No other Patrick McAtees were alive at that time period.)

[18] Brumbaugh, Gaius Marcus.  Maryland Records: Colonial, Revolutionary, County and Church, Vol.I. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkens, 1915.  See page 303. https://archive.org/details/marylandrecordsc01brumuoft/page/302

[19] 1782 Supply Tax, Charles County, MD. https://www.mdssar.org/sites/default/files/archives/1783taxlists/Charles_Co_MD1782OPT.pdf, see pdf 48/55.

[20] https://msa.maryland.gov/msa/stagser/s1400/s1437/html/1437ch.html

[21] 1783 Supply Tax, Charles County, MD. (Original source for Note 20.) https://www.mdssar.org/sites/default/files/archives/1783taxlists/Charles_Co_MD1783OPT.pdf

[22] Peden, Henry Jr. Maryland Public Service Records 1775-1783. Westminster, MD: Willow Bend Books, 2002.

[23] 1790 Federal Census, Charles County, MD, p 578. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YY8-SV7S?i=19&cc=1803959&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHKY-MKY

[24] 1790 Federal Census, Prince George’s County, MD, p 304.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YY8-SVJ2?i=19&cc=1803959&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHKT-PN2

[25] See the blog post by the author, “Pruning the McAtee Family Tree,” and the link to “Two Men Named John McAtee” https://docs.google.com/document/d/1h6DDJQe6tk9Ol-fV1wu352YyHuODzRn5Vx5slkrQVq0/edit

[26] Prince George’s County, MD, Will Book T 1, p 353. Will of John McAtee.

[27] https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I053586&tree=Tree1

[28] Donnelly, Mary Louise.  Charles County, Maryland: My Colonial Relations Plus Others, 2006.  See page 208 for profile of Walter McAtee.  See page 200 for information of John McAtee Jr which is confused and combined with information of John McAtee of Fairfax Co, VA, who was also in Prince George’s County in 1790.  See Note 24.

[29] Charles County, Maryland, Wills 1791-1801 (Hall of Records), p. 130: Will of John McAtee, Sr.

[30] The Rootsweb page “McAtees Mostly” lists a Walter McAtee born 1728, the son of Patrick McAtee and Ann Baggott.  There are many contradictions at the McAtees Mostly site.  I have published about Patrick McAtee, Sr who was married twice (first to Sarah Green, and second to Ann (maiden name unconfirmed), and died in 1756.  His children are listed in the 1751 Admin of one Benjamin McAtee.  No Walter is listed, so he either died before 1751 or he never existed.  No records show any other Walters until a younger Walter, born between 1770-1774, became an adult and lived in Allegany County, Maryland, where he died in 1833.

[31] 1810 Federal Census, Montgomery County, MD, p. 921. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBS-X9J?i=5&cc=1803765&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXH2X-T4Y

[32] See Note 11.

[33] 1820 Federal Census, Nelson County, Kentucky, p.5. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYY1-SCWG?i=7&cc=1803955

[34] 1830 Federal Census, Nelson County, Kentucky, p. 157. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYYF-2HH?i=26&cc=1803958&personaUrl=%2Fark%3A%2F61903%2F1%3A1%3AXHPG-4G9

Which Richard Gott is Powell’s Father?

Do you have the right Richard Gott as father of Powell Gott?

Recently a friend let me know that his DNA results were in.  He needed some help on his ancestry, particularly the lineage of his grandmother, Cora Gott Mayfield.  Looking at the online trees, the problem became apparent.  The online trees were based off one erroneous source.  They were all suggesting his ancestor, Powell Gott, was son of Richard Gott b. 1792 and wife, Milly Mannen, of Warren Co, KY.  Since all the trees said the same thing, it seemed to be true and proven.  Unfortunately, all appear to be relying on other online trees, not original records, and ultimately from the same source.  That source may be this online query:

[1]

There was no confirmation (and apparently the poster did not know about Richard Gott in Marion Co, IN) but this post from 2004 seems to be the earliest that I find Powell connected to Warren County Gotts.

                The danger of online pedigrees is that anyone can put anything online, but that does not mean it is correct–there needs to be some evidence!  You must do (or hire someone to do) the research into original records to confirm everything.  Your DNA will match, but all of your matches have to have the correct information to make it worthwhile.

                Here are the notes, evidence, and proof that Powell Gott was NOT the son of Richard Gott of Warren County, Kentucky, but another Richard Gott born between 1770 and 1775, married to Mary Hines.  I have included my steps in the process to help others in similar situations.

  1.  Locate the “low-hanging fruit”–the easy records to find!  In this case, census, marriage, and cemetery records.  Powell is named in the 1840,[2] 1850,[3] and 1860[4] census records.  He died in 1869.  No marriage record was found, but he does have a tombstone.[5]  Since Powell was in Sullivan County, Indiana, we should broaden our search in that county.
  2.  Locate other Gotts in the county.  The census records list several other Gotts in Sullivan County.  Among them are Lewis b. 1809, Jonathan b. 1810, Richard b 1815, and Powell b. 1818.  The age of these men make them most likely to be Powell’s brothers. 

Also listed in 1840 Sullivan Co:

Name and page Number 1840 census[6] Age based on 1850 Census Sullivan Co[7] (unless otherwise noted)
p. 95, Jonath’n Gott, age 20-30    
Lewis Gott, age 30-40               
age 40, bp KY in 1850 Putnam Co, IN.[8]
age 41, bp KY in 1850; wife is Eliza.
p. 212, Richard Gott, age 30-40   age 35, bp KY in 1850
p. 91, Powell Gott, age 20-30   age 32, bp KY in 1850

Now we have a few more names to find.

3. Do a statewide search for records.  If you use the Indiana Marriage Database to 1850,[9] and search Gott, you’ll find that Jonathan Gott married Margaret Harris 12 Feb 1834, in Montgomery County, Indiana; and Lewis married Eliza Groves 27 Nov 1828, in Marion County, Indiana.  Both of these places are significant.  There is a large family of Gotts in Montgomery County, all are descendants of Robert Gott, Sr (1745-1840) Revolutionary War veteran.  If Jonathan is part of that family, Powell would be also.

Lewis is in Marion County.

Additional records in Marion County include the marriages of William Gott to Elizabeth Groves, 1828; and Thomas to Ann Wright, 1835.[10] (The 1850 Marion Co census, shows Thomas was b. 1811 KY.[11])

4. Search for census records in Indiana.  There will be several in Montgomery County, but in Marion County there are only three in 1830; we see Richard, Richard again, and William. 

 William is age 20-30—b. 1800-10.  This could be another brother.

Richard (listed twice)[12] age 50-60—b. 1770-80.  This age makes him the logical father.  He has four younger males in 1830, two age 10-15—born 1815-1820, and two age 15-20—born 1810-15. 

Lewis is already married, so these four sons are Thomas and Jonathan, and Richard and Powell.

 So, we have found a man old enough to be the father of Powell and his brothers–Richard age 50-60. 

Where did he come from? 

5. Do a broad search for Richard Gott of this age in the U.S. census records for 1820 and 1810.  By doing this, we find there is a Richard Gott the right age in 1820 and 1810 in Shelby Co, KY, and also in Orange Co, NC.  Analyzing these records, we notice that Richard in NC had no sons.  Richard in Shelby did have sons–six to be exact.  Also, the Gotts from Montgomery County, Indiana, are all listed in Shelby County, too.  This connects all the records together.

6. Evaluate:  Powell was born in 1817 in Kentucky.  He lives near several Gott men about the same age.  At least one of them was married in Marion Co, IN.  In Marion County, we find Richard who is old enough to be the father, and in 1810 and 1820, we find Richard in KY with males the right ages to be these men.  No direct evidence was found, but all the other pieces seems to fit.

Now, we work the other route of this tree—looking for records about Richard and Milly Mannen Gott to see if it is possible that they are Powell Gott’s parents.

  1. Check the marriage records. Richard and Milly were married in 8 Sep 1814, in Warren County, Kentucky.[13] Although timewise they could be parents of Powell and Richard, they could not be parents of Lewis and the older brothers.  
  2. Richard is listed in Warren Co, KY[14] at the same time another Richard is listed in Marion Co, IN. So there are definitely two men with that name.
  3. In 1820 Warren Co KY census, Richard only has one male under 10 and two females under 10.[15] In the 1830 census, Richard has one male 10-15, and one male under 5.  This indicates that he only had one son born 1815 and 1820.
  4. Richard only has one son born around 1820 or earlier, and that is Simon Peter Gott.  Richard signs the marriage consent for Simon’s marriage in 1840.[16] Therefore, Powell, born in 1817, could not be Richard and Milly’s son.   NOTE: Deeds in the 1860s mention the “division of lands of Richard Gott” in Warren County.  That division of land should name all his heirs. (Unfortunately, I have not found it.)
  5. Evaluate:  If Richard and Milly are parents of Powell, they should have a son under 10 in their 1820 and two sons 10-15 (Simon P. and Powell) in the 1830 household.  Although they do have one son in the right age range, that son must be Simon Peter Gott, their oldest son.  There is no mark for Powell

Richard Gott and Milly Mannen are unlikely candidates for the parents of Powell Gott, but Richard Gott and Mary Hines of Shelby County, Kentucky, and Marion County, Indiana, certainly fit the bill.

Based on this, Powell Gott is the son of Richard Gott.  See the articles Shelby County, Kentucky: Tax Lists Rewrite Gott Genealogy and Richard Gott, son of Robert for evidence that Richard Gott is the son of Robert Gott, Sr. (1740-1840). 


[1] https://www.ancestry.com/boards/localities.northam.usa.states.kentucky.counties.warren/4799/mb.ashx.  The query is dated from 2004.  A message to the poster was unreturned.

[2] “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHTL-N5T : 7 September 2017), Powel Gott, Sullivan, Indiana, United States; citing p. 50, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 94; FHL microfilm 7,730.

[3] “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MHV4-XCR : 12 April 2016), Powel Gott, Haddon, Sullivan, Indiana, United States; citing family 221, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

[4] “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4NV-SWC : 13 December 2017), Powel Gott, 1860.

[5] Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 May 2019), memorial page for Powell Gott (10 Jan 1818–9 Sep 1869), Find A Grave Memorial no. 19583978, citing Smith Cemetery, Dugger, Sullivan County, Indiana, USA ; Maintained by StephanieSN (contributor 47383699) .

[6] 1840 U.S. Census, Sullivan Co, IN.

[7] 1850 U.S. Census, Sullivan Co, IN.

[8] 1850 U.S. Census, Putnam Co, IN.

[9] Indiana State Library, Indiana Legacy. “Indiana Marriages through 1850.” https://digital.statelib.lib.in.us/legacy/search.aspx?index=3

[10] Indiana State Library, Indiana Legacy. “Indiana Marriages through 1850.” https://digital.statelib.lib.in.us/legacy/search.aspx?index=3

[11] 1850 U.S. Census, Marion County, IN.

[12] 1830 U.S. Census, Marion County, IN.  Richard is listed once in Center Township and again in Warren Township.  The data is not exactly the same, but the number of people is.

[13] “Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2QD-Q1T4 : 17 May 2018), Richard Gott and Milly Mannen, 8 Sep 1814; citing Marriage, , Warren, Kentucky, United States, various county clerks and county courts, Kentucky; FHL microfilm 339,890.

[14] Check the 1830 census records for Warren County, Kentucky, compared to the Marion County, Indiana, information.

[15] 1820 U.S. Census, Warren County, Kentucky.

[16] “Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L93Y-HVZR?cc=1804888&wc=QD3Q-HMK%3A1589735617 : 17 May 2018), 005771975 > image 223 of 710; citing various county clerks and county courts, Kentucky.

Shelby County, KY: Tax Lists Rewrite Gott Genealogy

By Dann M. Norton (C) 2019

When I started genealogy research in 1983, at the age of 13, I was blessed to have several long-time researchers as penpals.  All my original research was conducted through letters to these friends—most now passed on—and to courthouses.  With the advent of the internet, correspondence was made quicker.  Today Familysearch.org and Ancestry.com make locating hard-to-get records as simple as opening up your laptop.  There are records that the previous researchers never saw, maybe did not know existed.  These records provide evidence of a different story for the Gott genealogy.

The accepted genealogy—or at least the one you see most often online—is that Richard Gott b. 1734 in Maryland, and his brother, Robert Gott b. 1745, lived in Orange County, NC.  Richard was married to Margaret Weems and had several children: Martha Gott Doyle, Sutton Gott, John D. Gott, Hannah Gott Reese, Richard Gott, Mary Gott Squires, Jonathan S. Gott, Elizabeth Gott Reese, and Peter Gott.[i]   BUT there are problems. No records give us any indication of Richard Gott’s age, so his birth year is a guess. The Richard and Margaret Gott who sold land to a Weems, did so in 1772 in Maryland,[ii] and Richard Gott was already in North Carolina at that time—so Margaret may not be his wife’s name at all. The Richard Gott born about 1734 is likely the same Richard listed in 1767, Gunpowder Manor, Dorchester County[iii] when Richard should be in North Carolina—so 1734 might not be his birthdate.

Robert’s story is a true mess.  A separate article is necessary to present the problems and make corrections to his biography.  Most online trees mix up Robert’s grandchildren with his children. Robert’s first wife is unknown.  His children by her were born between 1765 and 1799. After he moved to Shelby County, Kentucky, Robert married a widow, Lydia Nichols, and had four more children—William Nichols Gott, Wilson M. Gott, Sarah Gott Maddox Scott, and Dann B. Gott[iv]—and a step-daughter, Mary Ellender “Polly” Nichols Hall.[v]

That Richard and Robert of Orange County, North Carolina moved to Shelby County, Kentucky has never been disputed.  We see the connections from other Orange County names who are neighbors in Kentucky—the Doyles and Stubbins families specifically. 

The Shelby County tax lists are preserved and available on microfilm.  My initial research conducted in the early 2000s utilized the films available at the Willard Library, Evansville, IN.  Familysearch has digitized these films, and they can now be accessed online with a free account.  Six microfilm reels cover the years 1792 through 1875.  Lists for 1792 through 1815 (with a few years missing) is film No. 7834508; 1816-1829 is film No. 7834509.  By 1830, all of the Gotts had moved out of Shelby County, but lists for 1830 and beyond can be found on flims Nos. 8140981, 8539494, and 8188402.  The film No. 8516104 for 1868-1875 has not yet been digitized.

Tax lists are important, but often overlooked, records.  The earliest tax lists for Kentucky followed the Virginia format.  The head of household is named, with tallies for white males over 21, white males 16-21, blacks of specific ages, and livestock.  Between the years of the decennial federal census, tax lists can often help to verify whose household a recently married man came from.  That is the process used for this report.  Additionally, if someone disappears from a tax list, he may have died or moved away.  Often a list will show the “estate” of a person being taxed which can confirm the death.  When using tax lists, it is important to know what information was being sought.  Up to 1808, Kentucky lists show males age 16-21, but not after 1811. The 1822 tax list asked for children of school age—including females.  Sometimes tidbits of information included in the name, like “of Richard” can determine parentage.  Land was taxed, and the lists will show if a man owned land, owned land in other counties, and who first held the patent for the land, which could show descent through ownership.  Familysearch has digitized most, if not all, the tax lists for Kentucky, and they can be viewed with a free account.

The first Gott to appear in Shelby County, Kentucky, is Sutton Gott in 1799 with one male over 21 (himself) and 2 horses.[vi]  This indicates that Sutton was born before 1778, and most genealogies put his birth at 1764. Sutton is found in Henry County, Kentucky after 1799.[vii]  Henry County was formed from Shelby County in 1798.[viii] Also in 1799, Samuel Doyel, Sr, Farmer Doyel, Samuel Jr., and Thomas Doyel are listed on page 6.[ix]  By 1800, Gregory Doyel had joined the group.[x] Martha Gott married Gregory Doyle in 1785, in Orange County, North Carolina.[xi] 

1800 Tax list, page 7, lines 6-8 show the three Gotts listed.[xii]

April 29–Richard Gott—no land—1 over 21, one 16-21, 2 horses

Robert Gott—1 over 21, 2 16-21, 3 horses

April 30–Richard Gott, Jr.—one over 21.

Detail from the 1800 tax list, page 7.

All the 1800 tax list indicates is that there were three adult male Gotts with households.  We can figure out that Richard Gott, Jr. is obviously of a younger generation.  This then indicates that the supposed brothers—Richard and Robert—are there together: Richard has one male—likely a son—age 16-21, and Robert has two males 16-21.  Richard Jr. could be the son of either man because in early records “junior” only means “younger” not “son of.”  This Richard Jr is the son of Robert.[xiii]

1801 Tax List, page 8, lines 12-13.[xiv]

Richard Gott—one over 21

Robert Gott—two over, two 16-21, 4 horses

What happened to Richard, Jr.?  Or is this Richard the Junior and old Richard is missing?  It really could be either.  Richard, Jr. in 1800 has no horse, and this 1801 Richard has no horse.  Based on the next year’s list, and knowing that John Gott (son of Richard) married Gracie Stubbins in Jan of 1802[xv] in Orange County, North Carolina, and then appears in Shelby County in April[xvi]—it must be that John and Richard returned to North Carolina in 1801, settled up accounts there, then returned to Kentucky.  By 1802, all are back in Shelby County.

1802 Tax List 1, page 9[xvii]

April 8—line 6, Richard Gott, Sen—one over 21, 1 horse

line 7, John Gott, Jr.—one over 21, 1 horse

Ap 10—line 9, John Gott, Sr.—one over, 1 horse

Ap 14—line 13, Robert Gott 2 over 21, 1 16-21, 2 horses

line 14, Richard Gott Jr. one over 21, 1 horse

There seems to be a nice grouping of families in this list.  Richard Gott, Sr. with his son, called John Gott, Jr (because he is younger than another John Gott); Robert Gott with his son, Richard, Jr.  John Gott, Sr. is between the families, but with additional information,[xviii] one can determine that he is the son of Robert Sr.  Note that Richard Gott, Sr. has no other males in his household—at least none over 16 (born before 1786).  If Richard Sr. had any sons left in his house, they would be tallied here.  This is an important point when determining who his sons are and are not.

Robert Gott, Sr. shows himself over 21, another male over 21 (born before 1781), and two males 16-21.  The tax lists shows us that Robert Gott, Sr is the only one left with younger males in his household.

From 1803 through 1809, we will see a pattern of Gott men marrying and creating new households at the same time a male disappears from the home of Robert Gott, Sr.  The logical conclusion is that he has sons who are coming of age (age 21) and setting up their own homes.  One being John Gott who married Elizabeth Tucker, on 25 March, 1803, in Shelby County.[xix]

1803 Tax List, pages 7-9.[xx]

Mar12—p 7, line 28, Richard Gott Jun.—one over 21, 2 horses

line 29, John Gott—one over 21, 2 horses

Mar 17—p 7, line 32 (last line) John Gott son of Richard—one over 21, 1 horse

p 8, line 1, Robert Gott Jr.—one over 21, 1 horse

Ap 14—p 8, line 10, Richard Gott Sen—one over 21

Jun 14—p 9, line 5, Robert Gott Sen—61a Fox Run—one over 21, 2 16-21, 3 horses

By 1803, the Gott men are starting to purchase land.  Robert Gott, Sr. buys 61 acres on Fox Run. 

We see Richard Gott Sr, by himself.  We see both John Gott (son of Robert Sr) next to Richard Jr (son of Robert Sr).  We see John “son of Richard” as well.  This year, we see that Robert Sr lost a male over 21 from the 1802 list, and a Robert Gott, Jr. appears as a new household on the list.  Robert Gott Jr. married Rachel Cole on 12 October 1802.[xxi]  Based on his appearance in the tax list at the time when Robert Sr loses a male—Robert Gott, Jr. must be the son of Robert Gott, Sr.  Robert Gott , Jr. was born about 1781.[xxii]  Robert Gott Sr still has two males 16-21 in his home.

1804 Tax List 1, pp 9-11[xxiii]

May 1—p 9, line 24, Jonathan Gott –1 over21, 2 horses

May 7—p 9, line 26 (last line) Robert Gott Sr—61a Fox Run—1 over, 1 16-21, 3 horses

P 10, line 1, Robert Gott Jr.—1 over, 2 horses

May 10—p 10, line 2, John Gott—100a Christian Co, Little Riv.  2 over 21, 2 horses

Jul 11—p 11, line 6, Richard Gott—one over, 2 horses

line, 7, John Gott—one over, 2 horse.

Life starts to move a little faster.  We see the previous players from 1803, except for Richard Gott, Sr.  Since Richard drops off the list in 1804, it is assumed he died about 1803.  This is where all genealogies get the death date of 1803, Shelby County, Kentucky.  Technically, we do not know he is dead, but it is a logical conclusion.  There are no probate or deed records for Richard Gott, Sr.

A Jonathon Gott appears, age over 21, and guess what!  Robert Gott, Sr. loses a male in the 16-21 category.  This would show us that Jonathan is 1) the son of Robert Gott Sr., 2) age 20 in 1803, but 3) age 21 in 1804.  Jonathan was born then in 1783.  Jonathan Gott married Maryann Brackett on 11 August 1803, in Shelby County.[xxiv]  Jonathan has always been placed in the family of Richard Gott, Sr, probably because he moved to Warren County, Kentucky.  If Jonathan were the son of Richard, Sr, He would be listed in Richard’s household in 1800, 1802, and 1803. Since he is not, and there are no records to support this parentage, the tax list is evidence that Robert Gott, Sr is Jonathan’s father.

A recap of the first families of Gotts in Shelby shows us that there was a Richard Gott, Sr who had a confirmed son, John, known as John of Richard or John, Jr.  There was a Robert Gott, Sr. who had several sons including Richard, Jr., John (of age by 1802), Robert, Jr. (of age by 1803), and Jonathan (of age by 1804).  In 1804, Robert Gott, Sr. still has a male age 16-21—born between 1783 and 1788.

In 1805, the details are basically the same.[xxv]  All the men are listed as over 21, heads of households.  Robert Gott, Sr., still has one additional male age 16-21.  (This narrows down the son’s age between 17 and 20 based on the age in 1804 and 1805—born between 1785 and 1788.)

In 1806,[xxvi] Jonathan is gone.  One John Gott owns 40 acres on Bull Skin in Shelby County. (This is John Gott, Jr., also known as, John D. Gott, son of Richard, Sr.[xxvii])  Richard, the other John, and Robert, Jr. are listed.  Robert, Sr. is listed on page 8, line 1, with his 61 acres of land and no other males in his household.  Right below him, line 2, is Peter Gott, head of household, but only 16-21.  Peter Gott married Margarette McClemants on 9 December 1805, in Shelby County.  Since he was underage, he would need his father’s consent, but no consent has been located.  Based on Peter’s appearance on the tax lists in 1806, a few months after his marriage in December 1805; and knowing Robert Gott, Sr. had a son the right age in 1805, Peter must be Robert’s son.  Peter is always shown as a son of Richard Gott, Sr.; however, Richard, Sr. has no males the right age in his household in earlier tax records.  Just like Jonathan Gott, there are no records to support that parentage, but the tax lists are evidence that Peter is the son of Robert, Sr.  Jonathan and Peter seem to move in tandem, first to Warren County, Kentucky, then eventually their families end up in Greene County, Missouri.

By 1807, the Gott men are moving out of the county of Shelby.  Peter is still listed, age 16-21; Robert (with no land) is next to Peter.[xxviii]  On the next page is John Gott (no land),[xxix] and further down the page is Robert Gott, Sr., with 61 acres of land and a new male age 16-21.[xxx] Only one John is listed from 1807 on, and it would appear John Gott, Sr. (son of Robert Gott, Sr.) had moved away.[xxxi]

In 1808, John Gott[xxxii] is listed several lines above Robert Gott, Sr. (61 acres) who has a male 16-21.[xxxiii]  Below Robert is Peter Gott, now 21—making his birth year about 1787; below Peter is Robert Gott, Junior.[xxxiv] 

In 1809, the state of Kentucky did not ask for males age 16-21.  Robert, Jr., Richard, Peter, and Robert, Sr. (with 68 acres) are listed as heads of household.[xxxv]  Further down is John Gott.[xxxvi]

There is no 1810 Tax list for Shelby County, but that is the year of the federal census.  The census gives us additional information about the families by including the females.  The numbers below indicate males under 10, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, and 45+; females under 10, 10-16, 16-26, 26-45, and 45+.

Page 677, line 3                 John D. Gott       30010—20010

Page 676, line 3                 Richard Gott      21010—20010

Page 714, line 17               Robert Gott        30010—10010

Page 721, line 4                 Robert Gott        30101—11101

Page 730, line 9                 Peter Gott           20100—10100

Based on this information, Robert Gott, Sr is obviously the oldest man listed, age over 45. He has one male 16-26, which fits with the data in the tax records of 1808.  This narrows that son’s birth year to between 1787 and 1792.  Robert has females including his wife, Lydia, two older daughters, and then four children under 10, the children by Lydia. Based on the tax lists, all the other men are his sons, except for John D. Gott.  Peter, listed as 16-26, would be 23 based on the analysis of the tax records above.  Adding additional support that Peter is the son of Robert, Sr., the census shows Peter living next to Powell Skelton who married Hannah Gott on 28 May, 1805.[xxxvii]  Hannah is the daughter of Robert, Sr.  Next to Powell is Daniel Butler who married Margaret Gott, another daughter of Robert, Sr.[xxxviii]

In 1811, the Shelby County tax list again asks for males 16-21, and Robert Gott, Sr has a male in that age bracket.[xxxix] Richard and Peter appear on page 14 of that list, and Robert , Jr. and Sr. are on page 15, and John is on page 16.[xl]  In 1812, the only age bracket for white males is 21 and older, but this is the year Thomas Gott shows up on the tax lists as a 21-year-old landholder with 54 acres on Fox Run.  Thomas is the next Gott male to arrive of age from Robert Senior’s household.  From the records, it appears Thomas was the youngest son by Robert Senior’s unknown first wife.  No new Gott households will appear until the year 1825 when William Nichols Gott comes of age.  William N. Gott is the son of Robert Gott Sr and Lydia—if he is 21 in 1825, his birth year before 1804.

John D. Gott last appears in Shelby County in 1819.[xli]  He moves to Warren County, Kentucky.[xlii] Richard Gott’s last appearance is in 1824.[xliii]  He is located in Marion County, Indiana on the 1830 U.S. census.[xliv]  The year 1827 is Thomas Gott’s last tax record in Shelby,[xlv] and he moves to Montgomery County, Indiana.  William N.[xlvi] and Robert Jr. remain until 1828,[xlvii] but both move to Montgomery County, Indiana, as well.  Robert Gott, Sr. is the only one left in tax lists in 1829.[xlviii]  An 1824 deed between Robert and Lydia to their son, Dann B. Gott recites that Dann was to get the land as long as he took care of his parents.[xlix]  Another deed shows Robert and Lydia, and Dann and, his wife, Eliza Jane (nee Hannah) Gott selling that land in 1830[l] and moving to Montgomery County, Indiana.  They are not listed on the 1830 tax list.  Robert Gott, Senior’s last appearance was in 1829, page 33, line 30—the last line on the page.[li]

Robert and Richard Gott may have been brothers.  This has not been fully proved.  There are no records to give an indication of Richard’s age. Another possibility could be that Richard, Sr. was Robert, Sr’s father, and he had younger children by an unknown wife.  There are no known marriage records for Richard Gott.  We do know that Richard had children of comparable age to Robert’s children, and some of them had the same names.  There were two Richards in the children’s generation; two Johns, two Hannahs, and two Elizabeths.  Richard Gott, Sr. had at least those children, but finding evidence that Peter and Jonathan S. Gott are sons of Robert Gott, Sr, and not of Richard Gott, Sr. calls every one of his assumed children into question.  Could Sutton Gott be the son of Robert Gott, Sr. as well?  Even if he is Richard, Sr’s son, is he Robert, Sr’s half-brother or nephew?  No one has yet provided records to prove the kinship of Sutton to the rest of the family.

So, it is now the duty of responsible genealogists to ask, “What records prove my Gott pedigree?”  Many will be surprised that the top branches are built on guesswork, not facts.  What should hold greater credence?  An unsourced genealogy passed down by researchers from decades ago, or actual records, like these tax lists, that have been analyzed, perhaps, for the very first time. 

RECORDS ARE AMAZING THINGS! 

The children of Robert Gott, Sr. can be proven with records.  Since there were people in the next generation with the same name, we can pinpoint some of Richard’s children by default—Richard Gott (c. 1821 Orange Co, NC), John D. Gott, Hannah Gott Reese, and Elizabeth Gott Reese.  If some of the children of Richard were misattributed to his family, others could be also—there are (as yet) no conclusive records to link Martha Gott Doyle, Sutton Gott, or Mary Gott Squires to Richard, Sr. or to Robert Sr.  

Records do connect children to Robert, Sr. and these records change the accepted online genealogies. There are gaps in the birth years where more children could fit.   Robert’s confirmed children, with the evidence for their parentage is in the chart below. For more research on the Gott family searcg GOTT at my blog: http://www.dannmnortongenealogy.wordpress.com.

Children of Robert Gott, Sr    
by unk. first wife    
Name Approximate birth year Proof or evidence
John Gott 1765 Revolutionary War application
Richard Gott Bet. 1770-75 Tax lists, DNA
Robert Gott 1781 Tax lists
Jonathan S. Gott 1783 Tax lists
Hannah Gott (m. Powell Skelton) Bet. 1784-91 Marriage bond and consent
Peter Gott c. 1787 Tax Lists
Margaret (m. Daniel Butler) Bet. 1785-1794 Marriage bond and consent
Thomas Gott 1790 Tax lists
Nancy  (m. John J. Stubbins) 1791 Obituary of Samuel Stubbins[lii]
Elizabeth (m. Powell Skelton) 1790-1800 Biography of James Skelton[liii]
by Lydia (Maddox?) Nichols    
Wilson M. Gott Bef. 1810 Lydia Black Welty letter[liv]
Sarah (m. Robert Maddox) Bef. 1810 Lydia Black Welty letter[lv]
William Nichols Gott Bef. 1810 Tax lists
Dann B. Gott Bef. 1810 Shelby County KY Deeds

NOTES


[i] From a family group sheet by researcher, Mary K. Pierson (1922-2006); this is the family most often shared online.

[ii] Text of the deed can be found at Maryland Online Archives.  At the link http://aomol.msa.maryland.gov/000001/000726/html/am726–304.html.  Nothing in this deeds suggests Margaret is a Weems, but this is the record referenced for that conclusion.

[iii] Gaius M. Brumbaugh.  Maryland Records: Colonial, Revolutionary, County, and Church, Vol. II, page 43, listing 100 acres of Gunpowder Manor, leased to Robert Gott on 2 Mar, 1737, now in the possession of Mary Gudgeons (Robert’s widow, remarried to Thomas Gudgeons), for the lives of Richard (age 31) and Elizabeth (age 42) in 1767.

[iv] Lydia and Robert only had the four children named.  There are group sheets that show several children born to Robert and Lydia born after 1800.  Those children are actually the children of Robert Gott, Jr. and his first wife, Rachel Cole.  Why this mix up happened, and why no one else has analyzed the records to correct this misinformation befuddles the author.  Surely, I am not the first one to check the records…or am I?

[v] Bainbridge Hall married Polly Ellender Nichols “step-daughter of Robt Gott Sr” on 8 Oct 1806, Shelby County, Kentucky.  Marriage Bond linked at https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89S9-RFTY?i=668&cc=1804888&cat=192528.

[vi] Shelby County, KY, 1799 Tax List 2, p 8, line 14: Got, Sutton. 

[vii] Sutton Gott is listed in Henry County, KY, 1800 Tax list, p 9, line 10, through 1808 Tax List 2, p 4, line 5.  By 1810, he was on the Warren County, Kentucky, census records.

[viii] “Henry County, Kentucky.” Wikipedia.com.

[ix] Shelby County, KY, 1799 Tax List 2, p 6.

[x] Shelby County, KY, 1800 Tax List 1, p5, line 9.

[xi] Gregory Doyle to Martha Gott, bond dated 19 Oct, 1785. Link at Familysearch.org: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ9-NC3S?i=656.

[xii] Shelby County, KY, 1800 Tax List 1, p 7, lines 6-8.

[xiii][xiii] DNA matches between for the author’s father are high enough to confirm a sibling relationship between Thomas Gott (1790-1860) and Richard Gott, Jr.  Another Richard Gott, of comparable age, remained in Orange Co, NC.  He married Catey Gill, and died in 1821.  He lived near the Freshwater family, who purchased the land of Richard Sr.  ( see Orange Co Deed Book 8, p 133).  This proximity suggests Richard of Orange Co was the son of Richard Sr.

[xiv] Shelby Co, KY, Tax List 1801 List 1, page 8, lines 12-13.

[xv] John Gott to Gracie Stubbins, 2 Jan 1802, Orange County, NC, link at Familysearch.org: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ9-NQZR?i=1486

[xvi] Shelby Co, KY, Tax 1802 Tax List 1, page 9.

[xvii] Ibid.

[xviii] John Gott, who married Elizabeth Tucker, later moved to Darke County, Ohio.  He applied for pension off his father’s Revolutionary War service, naming Robert Gott as his father.  See, http://revwarapps.org/r4150.pdf.

[xix] “Kentucky Marriages, 1785-1979,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F47W-MM8 : 11 February 2018), John Gott and Elizabeth Tucker, 25 Mar 1803; citing , Shelby, Kentucky, reference ; FHL microfilm 259,273.

[xx] Shelby Co, KY, 1803 Tax List 1, pp 7-9.

[xxi] “Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89S9-R6TV?cc=1804888&wc=QD3Q-WXS%3A1300334232 : 17 May 2018), 005552474 > image 315 of 537; citing various county clerks and county courts, Kentucky.

[xxii] The birth year for Robert Gott (Jr) taken from his age in U.S. Census, Brown Tp, Mongtomgery Co, IN, p 1064, dwelling 821, family 851. Familysearch.org link: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-67K9-6X4?cc=1401638

[xxiii] Shelby Co, KY, 1804 Tax List 1, pp 9-11.

[xxiv] “Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89S9-R6P5?cc=1804888&wc=QD3Q-WXS%3A1300334232 : 17 May 2018), 005552474 > image 306 of 537; citing various county clerks and county courts, Kentucky.

[xxv] Shelby Co, KY, 1805 Tax List 1, p 8 (lines 1, 9, 20, 26, 27) and p 9 line 7.  Be aware of similar names like Goe, Gooch, Gothia, and Gie.

[xxvi] Shelby Co, KY, 1806 Tax List 1, p 7 (lines 14, 17), 8 (lines 1, 2, 3, and 12).

[xxvii] Shelby  Co, KY, Deed Book S, p 364, John D. Gott and Gracey, his wife, of Warren County, Kentucky,  sell 40 acres on Bull Skin to Sam M. White, 25 Feb 1822.

[xxviii] Shelby Co, KY, 1807 Tax List 1, p 8, lines 18-29.

[xxix] Shelby Co, KY, 1807 Tax List 1, p 9, line 3.

[xxx] Shelby Co, KY, 1807 Tax List 1, p 9, line 19.

[xxxi] See note 17.

[xxxii] Shelby Co, KY, 1808 Tax List 1, p 9, line 17.

[xxxiii] Shelby Co, KY, 1808 Tax List 1, p 9, line 29.

[xxxiv] Shelby Co, KY, 1808 Tax List 1, p 9, lines 30-31.

[xxxv] Shelby Co, KY, 1809 Tax List 1, p 5.

[xxxvi] Ibid.

[xxxvii] The marriage bond for Powell Skelton to Miss Hannah Gott “the daughter of Rob Gott.” Familysearch.org link: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9S9-RNTX?i=396&cc=1804888&cat=192528

[xxxviii] Daniel Butler to Margaret Gott, 1 Mar 1810; marriage consent dated 28 Feb 1810 signed by Robert Gott Sen. Familysearch.org link: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8937-KY5J?i=823&cc=1804888.

[xxxix] Shelby County, KY, 1811 Tax List 1, p 15, line 37.

[xl] Shelby County, KY 1811 Tax List 1, pp 14-16.

[xli] Shelby County, KY, 1819 Tax List 1, p 29, line 14.

[xlii] See note 26.

[xliii] Shelby County,KY, 1824 Tax List 1, p 30, line 11.

[xliv] Richard Gott is actually enumerated twice in the 1830 Marion County, IN, census.  Once in Center Township and again in Marion Township.  The census data is not exact, but certainly represents the same household.

[xlv] Shelby County, KY, 1827 Tax List 1, p 32, line 10; listed below Robert (Sr) and William N. Gott.

[xlvi] Shelby County, KY, 1828 Tax List 1, p 28, entry 23.

[xlvii] Shelby County, KY, 1828 Tax List 1, p 29, line 12, listed as “Gate, Robert” with 91 acres of land on Clear Creek, and two males over 21, indicating that his sons were coming of age.

[xlviii] Shelby County, KY, 1829 Tax List 1, p 33, line 30—last line of the page.

[xlix] Shelby County, KY, Deed Book U-1, 1824-1826,p 19. Available on Familysearch Film No. 007897709, image 275 of 770.

[l] Shelby County, KY, Deed Book Y-1, 1829-1831, pp327-28. Available on Familysearch.org Film No. 008141845, image 184 of 548.

[li] Shelby County, KY, 1829 Tax list, p 33, line 30.

[lii] See http://www.ingenweb.org/inmontgomery/obituaries/s/stubbins-samuel.htm.

[liii] See http://www.ingenweb.org/inmontgomery/bios%20s/–skelton—james-a.-.html

[liv] Letter written by Lydia Black Welty, granddaughter of Wilson Gott, originally in possession of Florellen Pan Krotz, great-granddaughter of Lydia.  This letter was sent to Gott researcher Barbara L. Goodbar from Hazel Voris, 1992.

[lv] Ibid.

Will of David Harmon, 1881

While updating some information on Wikitree and at Ancestry.com, I realized that most descendants of David Harmon apparently did not have his will. I located this will in 2006 at the courthouse in Independence, Kentucky. I cannot find it in the Kenton County court books available on FamilySearch.org, but I know that this will exists. My notes state that I found it in Fiduciary Box 15. It also says the will is copied in Book 2, but it is not the same Book 2 as on FamilySearch. I believe that there may be multiple books–a set kept in Independence, and another in Covington. Since the will is hard to acquire, I am making it available via my blog. This will is the only record that verifies the names of the children of David Harmon and his wife, Elizabeth Youngman: Samuel J. Harmon, John P. Harmon, Nancy M. Ackman, and Sarah Hightower. One more daughter, Mary, is listed in census records, but never married.

The Will

            Knowing the uncertainty of this life and now being far advanced in age and blessed with ordinary health sound mind and some property and being desirous that my property may be justly divided between my two now living children and the children of my two deceased children after my death—Wherefore I make this my last will and bequests to take effect at my death as follows—to wit—To my son Samuel J. Harmon I will and devise my homestead tract of land containing about one hundred and fourteen acres situated on the waters of cruises creek in Kenton County Kentucky on which I now reside conditioned that he my said son Samuel pay to the children of my son John P. Harmon deceased one thousand and fifty-dollars ($1050.00) payable one fourth one year after my death, one fourth two years after my death, one fourth three years after my death, and the remaining fourth four years after my death—said payments are not to bear interest until they mature and are to remain a lien upon said land untill paid and that he my said son Samuel pay to the children of my deased daughter Nancy M. Ackman one thousand and fifty dollars ($1050.00) in like payments without interest as above named with lien upon said land untill paid—and that he my said son Samuel pay the further sum of Eight-hundred and fifty dollars ($850.00) to my daughter Sarah A. Hightower payable in like payments without interest with a lien upon said land until paid as before discribed—all said sums I will and desire to said respective parties before named as the proceeds of my said Land it being the only real estate now owned by me and which I estimate to be worth Three thousand Eight-hundred dollars ($3,800.00) which amount I distribute as before directed having heretofore advanced two hundred dollars to my said son Samuel and the same amount to my said daughter Sarah A. Hightower thereby making an equal distribution of the Estimated value of my said land between my said four children.  I further will and devise all my money and personal estate to equal parts at my death after paying my funeral expenses and any just debts I may then owe to my said son Samuel and to my said daughter Sarah A. Hightower and to the children of my said son John deceased and to the children of my said deceased daughter Nancy M. Ackman the remaining fourth part of my money and personal Estate.  I further will and direct that my said son Samuel qualify as my executor without security at the first term of the Kenton county court after my death and that he at once advertise and sell to the highest bidder without appraisement all of my personal property, reduce it to money and distribute the same in four equal parts as before directed in this my last will and testament In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name this 18th day of June 1880.

Witness L.L.Yowell                                                                David Harmon

W.L. Harman

State of Kentucky

Kenton County Court

April Term April 18th 1881

                                    The foregoing purporting to be the last Will and Testament of David Harmon decd was February 21st 1881 produced in court filed and continued for probate and was at the aforesaid April Term proven, established, and admitted to probate as and for the last Will and Testament of said decedent and as such the same was ordered to be recorded which has been done accordingly.

                                                                        Attest:  Julius L. Bristow, Clerk

                                                                                    By Wes B. Wilson DC

Notes:  Transcribed 2006, by Dann Norton from the handwritten copy found in Fiduciary Box 15 at Kenton County Courthouse in Independence, KY.    This document is signed by David Harmon.

Copy is written in Will Book 2, page 7.

I could not find more documents to this estate at Independence, KY.

W.L. Harman, listed as a witness, is probably William Lucien Harman, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth Harman.  Benjamin and Elizabeth were parents of Lucien, Columbus, Louisiana Harmon Harden, and Berry G. Harmon who md. Rosette Ackman.

Additional references to the estate of David Harmon are found in Kenton County Order Books, 1858-1922, at FamilySearch, but there is no genealogical information given.

Kenton County Court Order Books (Familysearch.org, FHL No. 7647090,

Order Book 8, p. 166—E.J. Green, administrator of David Harmon, dec.—31 May, 1881

Order Book 8, p. 317—inventory recorded. 

Order Book 9, p 618—settlement of estate by E.J. Green, recorded, 23 June, 1884

Order Book 10, p 11—settlement.

Margaret Boardman Delay Bowman McAtee

By Dann M. Norton, (C) 2019

Margaret Boardman was born about 1776.[1]  Her father was Joseph Boardman, proved by the deed[2] where she sells Joseph’s land[3] that descended to her.  His widow was Elizabeth, so we assume this is Margaret’s mother.  According to Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records. Elizabeth’s maiden name was Parker.[4]  Some online trees also say Elizabeth was called Eunice Parker, and this is a red flag that careless researchers have conflated two people; no records are attached.

Margaret, whose nickname was Peggy, married James Delay on 25 August, 1796, in Bourbon County, Kentucky.[5]  The marriage bond, dated 16 August, was signed by James Delay and James Crouch.[6]   The marriage consent is another proof for Margaret’s parentage. 

                The consent shows us that Margaret’s mother, Elizabeth, signed as the witness.

This marriage either did not actually take place, or it was very short and ended in divorce. Since the marriage was listed in the Register, it must have occurred; therefore, a divorce seems most plausible. (Court minute records were checked, but no divorce was found.)  James Delay later married Mary “Polly” Delay on 25 October, 1797.[7]  According to online pedigrees, they eventually moved to Vermillion County, Illinois, where Mary Delay is listed on the 1830 census of Vermilion County.[8]  Pedigrees that show Margaret “Peggy” Boardman (or sometimes Mary Boardman) as mother of James Delay’s children are incorrect; his children have no Boardman DNA.

Margaret remarried to George Bowman, often spelled Boman.  The marriage bond was signed 23 January, 1798.[9]  The bondsman was John Gullian, who swore that Margaret was over 21 on the consent, written on the reverse of the bond.[10]  It is possible that Margaret needed the consent to prove she was not married to James Delay anymore. Not much is known about George Bowman.  A George Bowman (underage—since there is no mark for being over 21) is listed on the 1797 tax list of Bourbon County.[11]  He is listed four lines below Joseph Boardman.  The next time George is listed is the year 1802.[12]  In that list, his name was spelled Boman, he was over 21, and he was five lines below Joseph Boardman, and only two below Benjamin Boardman[13] (Joseph’s son). George and Margaret had one daughter, Elizabeth, born about 1800.[14]  George probably died after 1803, or maybe there was another separation.  At some point, he was gone, and Margaret then married Abednego McAtee. 

Abednego McAtee[15] was born about 1745 in Charles County, Maryland.  He resided in Rowan County, North Carolina during the 1780s and 1790s.  He appears to have had a wife in Maryland, and fathered at least two son, John McAtee (1775-18—Trigg Co, KY) and Abednego McAtee (1782 NC-1865 Rush Co, IN).  He may have had daugthers based on the 1790 census data. A marriage to Kathrine Shanklin, maybe have produced another son, William McAtee (1801-1875 Attala Co, MS).  By 1807, Abednego had moved to Montgomery County, Kentucky by 1807 when he appears on the tax lists.  He shows up in Montgomery until 1811, then from 1812 until 1822.  He apparently died between 1823 and 1826 (when daughter Polly married).

We know that Margaret married Abednego McAtee—even though we do not have a marriage record.  When her father, Joseph Boardman,[16] died, M. Macatee purchased three sheep from his estate.[17]  On 4 June, 1821, Margaret McAtee petitioned the Bourbon County court to settle the estate of Joseph; Benjamin Boardman was the administrator.[18] In 1824, Margaret McAtee sold her portion of Joseph Boardman’s land.[19] She is called Margaret McAtee, heir of Joseph Boardman in the deed.  There is no doubt that Margaret Boardman was married to a McAtee. It is not clear when she married Abednego McAtee, but surely after 1803 (the last time George Boman appeared on taxlists) and before 1807, (the year Abednego appears in Kentucky, and also the birth year for daughter, Polly). Although Abednego’s son, John, had lived in Montgomery County (1799)[20], and his nephew, Hezekiah, was in Bourbon from 1800-1806,[21] Abednego was the only adult McAtee in Bourbon and Montgomery Counties at this time.  Abednego McAtee is listed next to Elizabeth Boardman on the 1820 census of Bourbon County, Kentucky.[22]

In the 1810 census of Montgomery County, Abednego is shown with the following family members:[23]

1810 U.S. Census, Montgomery County, KY. Ancestry.com

Abednego, over 45, Margaret 26-45, a female age 10-16 (Elizabeth Bowman), a male 0-10 (probably William b. 1801),[24] and a female 0-10 (Polly, b. 1807).

In 1820, Bourbon County, the family consisted of five people.[25]

1820 U.S. Census, Stoner, Bourbon County, KY. Ancestry.com.

Abednego, over 45; Margaret 26-45, a male 10-16 (probably William McAtee), a female 10-16 (Polly), and a male 0-10 (Daniel, born 1812).

Margaret had at least one child, Elizabeth, by her Bowman husband.  Since she lived with her step-father, Abednego McAtee, Elizabeth is sometimes assumed to be a McAtee.  She was not, she was a Bowman.  The marriage consent, calling Elizabeth by “Bomin,” and signed by “Marget McAtee,” is clear on that fact.[26] 

Bourbon County, KY, marriage consent of Margaret McAtee for daughter, Elizabeth Bowman to marry John Howard; Witness, Barnabas Frakes. Research of Dena Wilson, descendant.

Elizabeth was only 12, maybe 13, when she married John Howard.  This was quite young.  Descendants have conjectured that perhaps Elizabeth was pregnant and a marriage was rushed.  However, this was also the time of the War of 1812.  Perhaps the imminence of war—and that included clashes with Native Americans—hurried John and Elizabeth to wed.  In any case, they did marry, had children, and eventually moved to Crawford County, Illinois.

Margaret also had at least two children by Abednego McAtee: a daughter, Mary “Polly” and a son, Daniel.  Daniel McAtee’s life and records have been compiled in the article, “Meet the Parents of Daniel McAtee.”

Mary, also called Polly, married Abner Wilson on 3 November, 1826, in Bath County, Kentucky.[27]  The consent for the marriage was signed by Marget Macatee.[28]

Abner had been previously married to Margaret Bradshaw Tipton, the widow of Solomon Tipton.[29] Sometime after their 1826 marriage, Abner and Polly, with her mother, Margaret, and brother, Daniel, moved to Colerain Township, Hamilton Co, Ohio. 

Margaret McAtee is listed in the 1828[30] (as Polly), 1829[31] and 1830[32] (as Margaret) Colerain tax lists. 

1829 Colerain Tp, Hamilston County, OH, tax list. FamilySearch.org.

Margaret’s name is not on the 1830 census, but it seems obvious that she and Daniel are living in the home of Abner Wilson. Abner Wilson is listed twice on the 1830 Hamilton County, Ohio, census.  (There are a couple of neighbors listed twice, as well, one being William Leggett, possibly a neighbor from 1810 Montgomery County, Kentucky.[33])  On the first report,[34] he is listed with an older female and a male who is too old to be his own child.

1830 U.S. Census, Colerain Tp, Hamilton County, OH. Ancestry.com.

On the second report,[35] the older female and extra male are not listed in Abner’s household, but next door is a Margaret Martin with a young male. 

1830 U.S. Census, Colerain Tp, Hamilton County, OH. (Second enumeration of Abner Wilson.) Ancestry.com.

No Margaret Martin is listed on the tax list, and it seems possible that this could be Margaret McAtee and Daniel.  No marriage of Margaret to a Martin has been located, so if this is indeed Margaret McAtee, it seems the census taker wrote Martin in error. 

There are no tax lists available for the years 1831-32, and neither Margaret McAtee nor Abner Wilson appear on Hamilton County tax lists from 1833-1835.  By 1833, Abner Wilson had moved to Shelby County, Indiana.[36]  Daniel McAtee married Elizabeth Shirley on 2 January, 1834,[37] in Shelby County, and patented land next to Abner.[38]  Margaret probably died in Ohio, prompting her children to move to Indiana.  If she made it to Indiana, no records have been found to indicate such.  She died after 1830, but nothing more precise has been uncovered.

Descendants of Joseph Boardman

Generation 1

  1. JOSEPH1 BOARDMAN was born in 1746. He died in Mar 1818 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. He married ELIZABETH PARKER. She was born in 1844. She died in 1832.

Notes for Elizabeth Parker: The maiden name of Elizabeth is given in the biographical sketch on the Boardman-Crose families in Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records by McAdams (p 320). The sketch also gives her birth and death dates.

Joseph Boardman and Elizabeth Parker had the following children:

2. i. BENJAMIN2 BOARDMAN was born on 30 Oct 1774. He died on 08 Sep 1840 in Nicholas, Kentucky, USA. He married KEZIAH RICE. She was born in 1775. She died on 01 Nov 1847.

3. ii. MARGARET BOARDMAN was born about 1776. She died after 1830 in Colerain, Hamilton, Ohio, USA. She married (1) EBEDNIGO MCATEE, son of Patrick McAtee and Ann Baggott after 1800 in Kentucky, USA. He was born between 1736-1747 in Charles, Maryland, USA. He died between 1822-1823 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. She married (2) JAMES DELAY in 1796 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. She married (3) GEORGE BOWMAN in 1798 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. He died before 1807.

Generation 2

2. BENJAMIN2 BOARDMAN (Joseph1) was born on 30 Oct 1774. He died on 08 Sep 1840 in Nicholas,Kentucky, USA. He married KEZIAH RICE. She was born in 1775. She died on 01 Nov 1847.

Notes for Benjamin Boardman: Benjamin’s birth and death dates are listed at Findagrave.com, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 March 2019), memorial page for Benjamin Boardman (30 Oct 1774-8 Sep 1840), Find A Grave Memorial no. 174358182, citing Boardman Family Cemetery, Carlisle, Nicholas County, Kentucky, USA ; Maintained by KEN (contributor 48781276) .

The Boardman-Crose biographical Sketch in Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records by McAdams (p 320) gives his birth as 1774 in “probably” New Jersey. His wife and children’s names are also listed with some birth and death dates.

Notes for Keziah Rice: Name, birth and death dates from Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records by McAdams (p 320).

Benjamin Boardman and Keziah Rice had the following children:

i. ANN3 BOARDMAN was born before 1796. She married Lewis Jones on 08 May 1810 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. An Ann Boardman married Lewis Jones 8 May, 1810, in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Some online trees place her as the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth, but Joseph showed no young females in his 1810 census report (Bourbon Co, KY p 97, line 3). Benjamin, however, showed two younger females in his household.

ii. JAMES BOARDMAN was born on 06 Dec 1796.

iii. WILLIAM BOARDMAN was born on 22 Nov 1797. He died on 16 May 1887.

iv. POLLY BOARDMAN was born in 1798. She died in 1815. She married Mathias Sears on 07 Sep 1815 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. A Polly Boardman married Mathias Sears in 1815, Bourbon County, Kentucky. Some online trees place her as the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth, but Joseph showed no young females in his 1810 census report (Bourbon Co, KY p 97, line 3). Benjamin, however, showed two younger females in his household. Marriage bond dated 7 Sept, 1815. Bondsman for the marraige of Polly to Mathias Sears was Benjamin Boardman. See https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-SLFL-J?i=607&cc=1804888. Polly may not have married, or was not married long, as a tombstone at the Boardman Cemetery for a Polly Boardman is engraved with the dates 1798- 1815. (The stone does not say Sears.)

Mathias Sears may be the man of that name who married Susannah Hostettler in 1821, Shelby County, Kentucky, and died in 1887 in Lawrence County, Indiana. (Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 23 March 2019), memorial page for Mathias Sears (30 Apr 1795-23 Jun 1878), Find A Grave Memorial no. 66225080, citing Hopkins Cemetery, Needmore, Lawrence County, Indiana, USA ; Maintained by AZ Susi (contributor 46978490)).

v. ABNER BOARDMAN was born on 16 Apr 1801. He died on 29 Aug 1875.

vi. SON BOARDMAN was born about 1815. A male is listed in the 1820 census, age 0-5. This male is not listed in 1830. It is possible this could be a grandchild, a child of Ann or Polly.

vii. ELI R. BOARDMAN. The Boardman-Crose biographical sketch names a son to Benjamin called Eli, but it says he died in Grapevine, Texas. However, the Eli R. Boardman who died in 1892 in Grapevine, Tarrant County, Texas, was born in 1831, and was the son of James Rice Boardman. It is unclear if Benjamin actually had a son named Eli.

3. MARGARET2 BOARDMAN (Joseph1) was born about 1776. She died after 1830 in Colerain, Hamilton,Ohio, USA. She married (1) EBEDNIGO MCATEE, son of Patrick McAtee and Ann Baggott after 1800 in Kentucky, USA. He was born between 1736-1747 in Charles, Maryland, USA. He died between 1822-1823 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. She married (2) JAMES DELAY in 1796 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. She married (3) GEORGE BOWMAN in 1798 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. He died before 1807.

Ebednigo McAtee and Margaret Boardman had the following children:

4. i. MARY “POLLY”3 MCATEE was born in 1807 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. She died after 1880 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. She married (1) ABNER WILSON on 04 Nov 1826 in Bath, Kentucky, USA. He was born about 1790. He died on 29 Mar 1841 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. She married (2) OLIVER HAWKINS on 02 Jun 1845 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. He was born about 1790.

5. ii. DANIEL MCATEE was born on 20 Jan 1813. He died on 29 Jan 1883 in Brimson, Grundy, Missouri, USA. He married Elizabeth Shirley, daughter of Isaac Shirley and Catharine Hendrickson on 02 Jan 1834 in Shelby, Indiana, USA. She was born on 14 Nov 1817. She died on 30 Apr 1886.

George Bowman and Margaret Boardman had the following child:

6. i. ELIZABETH3 BOWMAN was born in 1800 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. She died after 1870 in Clay, Illinois, USA. She married (1) JOHN HOWARD in 1812 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. He died before 1848 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. She married (2) JOHN CARTER on 08 Jun 1848 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. He was born in 1789 in England. He died after 1870.

Generation 3

4. MARY “POLLY”3 MCATEE (Margaret2 Boardman, Joseph1 Boardman) was born in 1807 in Bourbon,Kentucky, USA. She died after 1880 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. She married (1) ABNER WILSON on 04 Nov 1826 in Bath, Kentucky, USA. He was born about 1790. He died on 29 Mar1841 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. She married (2) OLIVER HAWKINS on 02 Jun 1845 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. He was born about 1790.

Abner Wilson and Mary “Polly” McAtee had the following children:

i. WILLIAM JACKSON4 WILSON was born in 1830.

ii. SARAH WILSON was born in 1833 in Ohio, USA. She married (1) GEORGE PEARSON on 20 Jan 1848 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. She married (2) JESSE ROTHROCK after 1850.

iii. DAVID ASPY WILSON was born on 03 Oct 1834 in Shelby, Indiana, USA. He died on Feb 1910 in Clifty, Bartholomew, Indiana, USA.

iv. THOMAS MCQUEEN WILSON was born in 1837. He died in 1925.

v. DANIEL MCATEE WILSON was born in 1838. He died in 1858.

vi. ABNER B. WILSON was born in 1841. He died on 04 Mar 1924 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA.

vii. MARY E. WILSON was born in 1841. She died in 1882. She married George Hege on May 1858.

Oliver Hawkins and Mary “Polly” McAtee had the following child:

i. JASPER4 HAWKINS was born on 19 Nov 1845 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA. He died on 26 May 1880 in Bartholomew, Indiana, USA.

5. DANIEL3 MCATEE (Margaret2 Boardman, Joseph1 Boardman) was born on 20 Jan 1813. He died on

Jan 1883 in Brimson, Grundy, Missouri, USA. He married Elizabeth Shirley, daughter of Isaac Shirley and Catharine Hendrickson on 02 Jan 1834 in Shelby, Indiana, USA. She was born on 14 Nov 1817. She died on 30 Apr 1886.

Daniel McAtee and Elizabeth Shirley had the following children:

i. MARGARET JANE4 MCATEE was born on 01 Dec 1834. She died on 29 Nov 1912. She married (1) OBEDIAH HUDSON on 23 Oct 1851. He died on 18 Jul 1868. She married (2) SOLOMON T. COLE on 18 Jan 1875.

ii. MARY ANN “POLLY” MCATEE was born on 21 Feb 1837. She died on 11 Jan 1907. She married Joel Jefferson Long on 08 Jul 1853.

iii. CATHERINE MALISSA MCATEE, born 839, married RICHARD TOLLIVER  HUDSON.

iv. JAMES H. MCATEE was born in 1842. He died on 24 May 1862.

v. WILLIAM ABNER MCATEE was born on 22 Oct 1843 in Shelby, Indiana, USA. He died on 25 Apr 1919 in Madison, Grundy, Missouri, USA. He married Dicy Harper on 24 Feb 1861 in Daviess, Missouri, USA. She was born on 01 Apr 1843. She died on 08 Feb 1925 in Taylor, Grundy, Missouri, USA.

vi. ROSEANNE MCATEE was born in 1847. She died on 07 Jan 1879. She married Joseph A. Hunter on 22 Nov 1876.

vii. NANCY ELIZABETH MCATEE was born on 20 Jul 1849. She died on 21 Jul 1934. She married John W. Hughs on 11 Feb 1866.

viii. ELIZA E. MCATEE was born in 1852. She married John Burnett on 14 Sep 1873.

ix. DANIEL SYLVESTER MCATEE was born on 25 Nov 1854 in Grundy, Missouri, USA. He died on 25 Apr 1932. He married SARAH ANN PREWITT.

6. ELIZABETH3 BOWMAN (Margaret2 Boardman, Joseph1 Boardman) was born in 1800 in Bourbon,Kentucky, USA. She died after 1870 in Clay, Illinois, USA. She married (1) JOHN HOWARD in 1812 in Bourbon, Kentucky, USA. He died before 1848 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. She married (2) JOHN CARTER on 08 Jun 1848 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. He was born in 1789 in England. He died after1870.

Notes for Elizabeth Bowman: John Howard listed 1820 Stoner, Bourbon County, Kentucky, (Page 68, line 28) age 16-26, wife 16-26, one daughter and one son 0-10. In 1830, the family is listed in Crawford County, Illinois; seven children are in the household, six have been identified. (The missing son is probably Samuel Howard who married Susan Hackney, 29 Aug 1847, in Crawford County.) The 1840 census is unreadable. Elizabeth married John Carter 8 June 1848, in Crawford County, after John Howard died. John and Elizabeth Carter are listed in 1850 Martinsville, Clark County, Illinois. They moved to Clay County, Illinois. Elizabeth died after 1870, probably in Clay County, Illinois.

John Howard and Elizabeth Bowman had the following children:

i. SARAH ANN4 HOWARD was born in 1815. She died in 1847 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. She married James Boyd on 03 May 1838 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. (Birth and death dates from the online tree of Irene Walls.)

ii. JANE HOWARD was born in 1821 in Kentucky, USA. She married Henry Kirby on 12 Aug 1839 in Crawford, Illinois, USA.

iii. MARY HOWARD was born about 1823 in Kentucky. She married Joseph Cooley on 25 Aug 1841 in Crawford, Illinois, USA. (Online trees show Mary with parents John and Elizabeth (Bollard) Howard, but that couple lived and died in England–they did not have children born in Kentucky, and thus cannot be her parents. John and Elizabeth (Bowman) Howard are the only Howards in Crawford County with children the right age to be Mary and her siblings.)

iv. ISAAC HOWARD was born in 1825 in Kentucky, USA. He married Selina Hackney on 14 Sep 1843 in Crawford, Illinois, USA.

v. JAMES HOWARD was born in 1827 in Kentucky, USA. He married Susan Hackney on 29 Aug 1847 in Crawford, Illinois, USA.

vi. MARGARETTA HOWARD was born in 1834 in Illinois, USA. She married William Hackney on 12 Feb 1849 in Crawford, Illinois, USA.


[1] Margaret, listed as the oldest female in Abednego McAtee’s household, 1810 Montgomery Co, KY was 26-45, so born between 1765 and 1784.  She was again 26-45 in the 1820 Bourbon Co, KY household of McAtee, so birth between 1775 and 1794.  Taken together, that places the birth between 1775 and 1784.  Margaret is listed as the oldest female in the home of Abner Wilson, 1830 Colerain Twp, Hamilton Co, OH, age 50-60, which narrows her birth to 1770-1780.  Synthesizing all these census records, we can place Margaret’s birth to “between 1780 and 1785.”  This would have made her between 16 and 21 when she married James Delay.  Her second marriage consent, 1798, states she is over 21—born before 1777.  We can therefore pinpoint her birth to 1775 or 1776.  Her brother, Benjamin, was born in 1774 (from Findagrave), so 1776 makes the most logical year.

[2] Bourbon County, Kentucky, Deed Book R, p 180, Margaret Macatee to Henry Banta, 20 March, 1824.  Margaret Macatee is called one of the heirs of Joseph Boardman. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSTN-T9QM-B?i=362&cat=431279.

[3] Joseph’s original purchase is found in Bourbon County, Kentucky, Deed Book C, p 759. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4K-K96V-R?i=711&cat=431279.

[4] In the article “Meet the Parents of Daniel McAtee” the author suggests that Elizabeth could be a Prater because of the several Prater neighbors in census records. But Parker is given by the biographical sketch in Kentucky Pioneer and Court Records claiming that dates of births and deaths were taken from the family Bible of Benjamin Boardman, Joseph Boardman’s son.

[5] Bourbon County, Kentucky, Marriage Register, Vol 1, p. 29. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3CVB-F?i=44&cc=1804888

[6] Bourbon County, KY, Marriage bond, Delay to Delay, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-SL99-N?i=832&cc=1804888.

[7] Bourbon County, Kentucky, Marriage Register, Vol. 1, p 33. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3CV5-F?i=46&cc=1804888. Link to original register: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3CK8-V?i=22&cc=1804888

[8] 1830 U.S. Census, Vermilion County, Illinois, p 224, line 12, household of Mary Delay.

[9] Bourbon County, marriage bonds, Boman-Boardman, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3CR8-X?i=396&cc=1804888.

[10] https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3CRJ-L?i=395&cc=1804888

[11]  Tax Lists, Bourbon County, KY. 1797, page 2, line 37.

[12] Tax Lists, Bourbon County, KY. 1802, List 2, page 3, line 28.

[13] Benjamin Boardman (1774-1840) married Keziah Rice.  Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 25 March 2019), memorial page for Benjamin Boardman (30 Oct 1774–8 Sep 1840), Find A Grave Memorial no. 174358182, citing Boardman Family Cemetery, Carlisle, Nicholas County, Kentucky, USA ; Maintained by KEN (contributor 48781276).

[14] Birth year based on her age in the 1850 Census of Crawford Co, IL: Elizabeth Carter, age 50.

[15] https://dannmnortongenealogy.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/abednego-mcatee-a-name-with-a-swing/

[16] Records for Joseph Boardman: Bourbon County, KY, Court Order Book F, p 152 (last will ordered recorded). Will Book F, Will p 120 (Rec. April 1818); Sale bill p 147 (June 1818), and Inventory p 148 (June 1818).

[17] Bourbon County, Kentucky, Will Book F, p 147-149.  M. Macatee listed on first line of p 148. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GPSY-3MQ?i=335&cc=1875188&cat=279820.

[18] Bourbon County Order Books. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLX-J1WC?i=517&cat=288785.

[19] See Note 2. This deed was dated 1824, but the biography of the Boardman-Crose family says Elizabeth died in 1832.  An older female, 80-90, is listed in Benjamin Boardman’s household in 1830 U.S. Census, Nicholas County, KY, page 181, line 27.

[20] Tax Lists, Montgomery County, Kentucky, 1799.

[21] Tax Lists, Bourbon County, Kentucky, 1800-1806.

[22] 1820 U.S. Census, Stoner, Bourbon County, KY, page 72, lines 1 (Abednego Macatee) and 2 (Elizabeth Boardman)

[23] 1810 U.S. Census, Montgomery County, KY, page 379, line 5.

[24] A William McAtee (1801-1875) lived in Attala Co, MS; census records show his birthplace in Kentucky.  Research in collaboration with Dr. William Graeber McAtee (William’s descendant) shows plausible evidence that William represents the tick mark for the younger male in Abednego’s household. 

[25] See Note 20.

[26] Bourbon County, Marriage Consent. From the research of Dena Wilson.

[27] Bond, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3ZK?i=378&cc=1804888

[28] Consent, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9398-3Z6?i=379&cc=1804888

[29] Solomon Tipton married Margaret Bradshaw on 16 Mar, 1809, Montgomery County, but died by 1817 in Bath County. Solomon is listed in Bath County tax lists until 1816 with 140 acres Hinkston Creek.  Margaret is listed with his land in the 1817 through 1819 tax lists.  Margaret Tipton married Abner Wilson on 18 June, 1819.  Abner is listed with the Tipton land 1820-1825 tax lists.  Margaret must have died about 1825.  In 1826, Abner is not listed with the Tipton land, and he married Polly McAtee that same year.

[30] Hamilton County, OH, Tax Duplicates, 1828. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GPPD-XH?i=118&cat=237430.

[31] Hamilton County, OH, Tax Duplicates, 1829. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9PPD-D48?i=128&cat=237430.

[32] Hamilton County, OH, Tax Duplicates, 1830. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GPPD-QGW?i=144&cat=237430.

[33] 1810 U.S. Census, Montgomery County, KY, page 379, line 3.

[34] https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YBM-9N77?i=11&cc=1803958 

[35] https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GYBM-9NVG?i=19&cc=180395

[36] U.S. Dept of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, Accession No. IN0650_.121, Shelby County, Indiana, 30 October, 1834.  Land patent for Abner Wilson. (Indexed as “Almer Wilson.”) https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=IN0650__.121&docClass=STA&sid=z0nuii45.5bb#patentDetailsTabIndex=1

[37] Shelby County, Indiana, Marriage Book 3, page 2. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9XF-9BP?i=361

[38] U.S. Dept of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, Accession No. IN0750_.396, Shelby County, Indiana, 28 October, 1835. Land patent for Daniel Macatee. https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=IN0750__.396&docClass=STA&sid=eikhid2m.jzn#patentDetailsTabIndex=1